Tag Archives: Twitter

Social Networking – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive research information about social networking is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Social networking, like other forms of communication and community, is what makes technology usage expand.  People will always be on the lookout for new ways to communicate, whether it be with friends, strangers, or prospective colleagues.  The popularity of social networking sites can make ordinary phones and email less interesting to the modern consumer, increasing demand for smarter smartphones and faster Internet connections.

At the same time, privacy concerns, information overload, and innocent and criminal abuses can dampen the enthusiasm or participation for some market segments.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to social networking. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece; it’s a resource that can answer these and other key questions.

  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How many display screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Early Independent Research on Google+ Users

Google+ Adoption – preliminary results from MetaFacts

Early Independent Research on Google+ Users

By Dan Ness, Principal Analyst, MetaFacts

The earliest adopters of Google+ are a unique slice of highly-active socially-networked users.

Early results are showing a good-news/bad-news combination for Google+:

  • Bad news: Early Google+ users are above average among social networkers who have recently unfriended someone, removed content, and adjusted their privacy settings. They are well below average in friending someone, not a very bullish sign.
  • Good news: Early Google+ users are also above average among social networkers in clicking ads, RSVP’ing events, playing games, sharing photos, and watching videos

Unlike the launch of Google Buzz, which brought privacy concerns to the fore, Google+, even privacy-adjusters to be trying out Google+, at least so far.

Evidently, Google+ controlled its “field trial” launch, inviting and allowing in a carefully selected audience. Over half are highly experienced tech users, with 16 or more years under their belt since they used their first PC, and 12 or more years using a mobile phone (smartphone or basic feature phone).

In the coming year, it’s unlikely to see an either/or scenario between Google+, Facebook, and Twitter. Instead, the most-active social networkers will simply expand their experience, influence, and content across an ever-wider network. The privacy-conscious and ad-averse are likely to remain in the shadows or with minimal involvement. Up for grabs is the largest middle segment, and this group is most likely to wait and watch for a simple and safe experience which piques their interest. This will come in the form of competitive apps on Facebook, extensions to Twitter, or further innovation from Google.

Background and Methodology

Google+ came live shortly before the fielding of the 29th year of the MetaFacts Technology Survey, so we expanded the comprehensive user survey to include Google+ along with other social networks.

The Technology User Profile survey is independently conducted by MetaFacts. The syndicated research original service provides solid sizing and segmentation information about technology use, uniquely allowing for deep dives into use of competitive and substitute products as well as interactive segmentation and profiling.

Based on surveys with thousands of representative respondents reached by telephone and online, the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Service survey the entire range of information technology users. The full market is surveyed, from those with the richest collection of products such as Smartphones to Tablets and Netbooks, to those who don’t even use a mobile phone or PC.

Soon we will be releasing key takeways about the earliest adopters for the new service. Watch this site – technologyuser.com – for brief, complimentary updates. For full details, a special Google+ Flash Report will also be available at a special rate. Send a request to be notified of availability. Subscribers to the 2011 Technology User Profile services will receive updates directly.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Market Segmentation, Statistics, Technology, TUPdate

Calling the Shots While Driving the Wagon: Renegades say they should be allowed to text or email while driving

Busiest Road Warriors want to Text or Email While Driving – MetaFacts

October 2012 update – TUP 2012 results showing distracted drivers holding steady at nine percent.Calling the Shots While Driving the Wagon: Renegades say they should be allowed to text or email while driving

A MetaFacts TUPDate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

When you change lanes on the highway, you hope that the guy next to you isn’t a distracted driver looking at his smartphone instead of at the road. Ninety percent of the time, you’d be fine. On the other hand, a recent MetaFacts Technology User Profile survey showed 9% of online Americans agree or strongly agree with this statement: “I should be allowed to text or email while I am driving a car.” Nine percent isn’t 100%, but considering the concentration of people on the road in any ordinary rush hour, that 9% adds up to a lot of road risk.

Who are these renegades? It seems they have a few commonalities, ranging from age, state, and parental status to privacy attitudes. Eighteen percent of 18 to 24-year olds surveyed felt that they should be allowed to text and email while driving, and the concentration of renegades indeed appears to be in the young-uns: that 18% is double the national average. The 25 to 34-year-old group come in second, with 16% wanting to multitask in their vehicles, followed only slightly more slowly by the 35-44 age bracket with 10%. After that, percentages drop down to 5% and lower in older age groups—it seems that most of these rebels get hit with a dose of safety-juice by the time they hit their mid-forties.

Yet, there is something these folks have in common which points to a concern for safety, even coupled with their desire to type and drive, and that is their tendency toward device-security consciousness. 71% of renegades agree: “For security, I do things such as password-protecting my phone or limiting what is stored on it,” compared to the national average of 30%. Is the line between physical safety and the safety of our information becoming blurred, or is this issue just holding the door for better voice-recognition technology?

Are these renegades simply using mobiles for texting or emailing more than average? MetaFacts survey shows the links between age and texting in general, where 18 to 24-year olds top the charts as well. That age group’s attitude about texting while driving reflects this inclination. Mobile emailers, on the other hand, are led in a close race by the 25 to 34-year-old demographic (42% of 25-34-year-olds use their mobile devices for email vs. 37% of 18-24-year-olds and 32% of 35-44-year-olds).

While age seems one of the main things renegades have in common, gender does not appear to be a significant factor in who texts and drives; only slightly fewer women than men surveyed wanted to use their keypad en route (7% and 11%, respectively). But be they men or women, what might tie these people together is a hunger for better, more streamlined technology.

Judging from the types of phones renegades use, it seems their thirst for new technology may be comparable to their need for untimely texting and emailing. 21% of Android users are renegades, followed close behind by 20% of Apple iPhone users and 16% of Blackberry users. This tech-heavy crowd might just be waiting for the right technology to help them send an email in the car, without having to type it out the old-fashioned way.

Clearly, this scary finding implies a need for a shift in the world of smartphones, and mobile companies should take note. While safety-inducing apps exist to render texting and emailing applications defunct while operating a vehicle, they tend to be geared toward the protective parenting set, which make them seem unlikely that they would appeal to the renegade mindset. In that case, better voice-recognition technology ought to be on the forefront of this issue. Some of this technology is already in place, and the renegade wordsmiths on the roads today seem likely to keep up their bad behavior, favoring accessibility and convenience over safety.

This seems as much an issue for marketing as R&D. The demand for voice-activated texting and email for this niche of rebels, with their busy lifestyles and need for constant quick communication, may lie more in the convenience and speed of the new technology rather than its image as a safety feature.

MetaFacts expects the first early adopters for this technology to include several unique and dissimilar segments: ultra-mobile road warriors, tech-savvy soccer moms, hyperactive smartphone users, Twitter addicts, certain ethnic groups, particularly in states enforcing distracted-driver laws. With that as the case, these texting renegades may be leading voice-activated texting and email out of the periphery so that it can, so to speak, take the wheel.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through a customized report and analysis. Or contact MetaFacts for the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other Internet-oriented questions TUP covers on www.technologyuser.com.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010, TUP 2012, TUPdate

23.5 million online Americans age 18-34 don’t use a social network. 6.8 million cite privacy concerns. Reported in MetaFacts TUP survey

Is privacy a big concern among younger non-social networkers?

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, MetaFacts Principal Analyst

Privacy concerns are a strong deterrent to future Facebook growth, even among the age 18-34 segment.

The younger adult segment has a high penetration rate, with 63% regularly using a social networking site. While the maximum likely penetration rate is the subject of other MetaFacts saturation rate research, continued penetration only becomes more and more difficult from such a high base.

Of the 23.5 million Americans age 18-34 not networked, 29% agree or strongly agree with the statement: “I do not use a community/social networking group because I am concerned about my privacy”.

Agreement is even stronger among older adults.Chart: Privacy concern by age group

Recent news about the compromised security of private information is likely to further increase pervasive privacy concerns. When even highly-guarded information of governments and corporations is released publicly through organizations such as WikiLeaks, consumer trust can be further shaken in the effectiveness of the privacy controls of social networks.

At the same time, the FTC’s Do-Not-Track proposal offers a governmental approach to supporting and rebuilding consumer trust online. Although considered heavy-handed by many advertisers, it reflects a percolating problem already evident by the use of adblockers, spam controls, and very low click rates.

With nearly 30 years of watching and surveying technology consumers, answers to an attitudinal agreement scale questions don’t tell the whole story. Many American consumers are fickle and have short memories. Still, the answers are very high among an otherwise technically-active and accepting segment. Fear of the unknown can outweigh the desire for connection, entertainment and other benefits enjoyed by current social networkers.

Social networking sites Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and others already have plenty of challenges retaining the interest and patronage of their current members. With privacy and other concerns being expressed so strongly even among generally open younger Americans, MetaFacts expects the dampening effect to continue for years. Both those already networked and those not yet connected are thinking twice about their choice of “friends.”

Source

MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition – report available by contacting MetaFacts. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically or as hard copy. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of communication products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, chat, and webcams – see the other communication-oriented questions TUP covers on www.technologyuser.com.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Windows Vista, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts or call 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, Poll, Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010, TUPdate

Social Networking – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive research information about social networking is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Social networking, like other forms of communication and community, is what makes technology usage expand.  People will always be on the lookout for new ways to communicate, whether it be with friends, strangers, or prospective colleagues.  The popularity of social networking sites can make ordinary phones and email less interesting to the modern consumer, increasing demand for smarter smartphones and faster Internet connections.

At the same time, privacy concerns, information overload, and innocent and criminal abuses can dampen the enthusiasm or participation for some market segments.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to social networking. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece; it’s a resource that can answer these and other key questions.

  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns in use of social networking?
  • How do ad volumes affect usage?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups? How different are usage patterns by age?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Is email being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • Which social networking sites dominate? How does this vary by country and demographic group?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows and Blackberry users?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • How many online adults use dial-up to go online, and which countries stand out?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Most-mobile customers – where they go and what they do
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Which segments are utilizing the cloud? For which activities?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • How important is privacy when getting rid of old computers?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How are users incorporating digital images, through the use of digital cameras, scanners, downloading images, as well as how are they producing output?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do get one again, if you do?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010