Tag Archives: TV

Streaming Subscriptions – the Age Cliff for Music (TUPdate)

Streaming subscriptions are popular, with 69% of online adults actively using at least one type of free or paid digital media subscription. Penetration is highest among younger than older American adults. Nearly nine in ten online adults in the US aged 18-34 use a digital media subscription. This is based on results from the 2018 wave of MetaFacts TUP/Technology User Profile, based on 7,886 respondents in the US, and 12,680 respondents across the US, UK, Germany, and India.

The majority of subscribers have a paid subscription – 85% of all online adults. Only a small percentage of users limit themselves to only free subscriptions, and that’s true across all age groups.

Paid streaming music has a lower overall penetration at 28% of online adults. There is a usage cliff after age 44, with penetration being much stronger among younger than older adults. Less than one in five adults age 45 to 54 use a paid media music subscription, and that rate is even lower among the age 55-64 (12%), and 65 or older (8% of online males and 6% of online females).

For streaming video, NetFlix is the long-established leader with the highest penetration. While adoption of the 1-screen plan is stronger than the 2-screen or 4-screen plan in the US and India, in the UK and Germany each plan has comparable use. Amazon’s Prime Video offering, although relatively more recent, has reached half the share of NetFlix in the US and UK, two-thirds in India, and near-parity in Germany.

Family plans have gained widespread use. Nearly half of US online household with 4 or more persons are actively using a paid family streaming plan from one of the major services: NetFlix, Apple, Spotify, or Deezer.

Comparing over-the-top (OTT) digital media subscriptions to traditional TV subscriptions, in the US, UK, and India, active OTT use surpasses the use of cable, satellite, or phone cable TV subscriptions. DVD rental, while diminished, is still a regular practice among nearly a fifth of online Americans, and 10% of online adults in India.

Looking ahead

When it comes to fun, art, and entertainment, there’s room for many outlets. Although many creators work hard to exclusively own, control and entice viewers and listeners, consumers are free to change their minds and they often do.

Consequently, I expect the majority of consumers to continue expanding their subscriptions, both in the number they use and the range of type of media they subscribe to. However, as content providers continue to jockey for position, joining and then leaving various services, consumers will continue to churn between services. Similarly, as existing providers continue to experiment with varied packages – from family and student to single and multi-screen – consumers will join in the experiments, with many switching and swapping between services. In other words, for years to come I expect two opposing forces. Consumers will pay for more than they use, primarily for the convenience of enjoyment when they want it. Also, consumers will continue with their subscriptions through inertia and confusion, without remembering which content is enabled through which subscription.

Although subscription fatigue may be growing in awareness, habit consumption will prevail over a reasoned review of subscriptions.

About this TUPdate
The analysis in this TUPdate is based on results drawn from the most-recent wave of TUP (Technology User Profile), the 2018 edition which is TUP’s 36th continuous wave. This survey-based study details the use of technology products by a carefully-selected and weighted set of respondents drawn to represent online adults. This specific wave spanned the US, UK, Germany, India, and China.

Resources
Current TUP subscribers may request the supporting TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis. For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Demographics & Econographics, Entertainment, TUP 2018, TUPdate

Tech Media, Advertising, TV – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about tech media, advertising and TV is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Today’s media-savvy consumers may want their MTV, but they might seek alternative methods to get it.  Advertising seems to have become an option for the consumer, who today is able to bypass commercials, salespeople, and even email in favor of social networking and other sites.  Advertisers in this day and age have to be both flexible and targeted while ubiquitous in order to get their message across.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to tech media, advertising, and television. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers solid answers to the following questions, and more.

  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within market segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Internet – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about the internet and the ways people use it is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Not all access to the Internet is equal and consumers know it – voting with their fingers. In today’s multi-platform age, computers are not the only way online, and email may be losing ground as the king of activities.  Are fun, compelling, and emerging technologies making PCs a thing of the past?  Is social networking replacing snailish email?

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to internet use. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides a comprehensive source to answer the following questions, as well as many others.

  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Which segments are utilizing cloud storage or sharing services? For which activities?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones? How about from tablets?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Which segments are using which tech devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How does PC and online usage vary across segments such as workplace company size or industry?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Tracfone for oldsters? Who has the oldest segment by carrier?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Digital Entertainment – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about Digital Entertainment is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Technology marketers and researchers know what Johnny Carson pointed out many years ago: “People will pay more to be entertained than educated.”

As fickle consumers continue to change their tastes and preferences, entertainment has been core. In particular, Digital Entertainment has been the closest thing to the fabled silver bullet that will increase market adoption with some products and services becoming hits while others fail and become tech industry footnotes.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to digital entertainment. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies and services are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of the Technology User Profile Global Insights Edition may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Gaming with PCs, Consoles, and Handhelds — solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about gaming is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

It’s so easy when you know the rules – so goes Queen’s 1980 power ballad.  These days the rules may be changing all the time, with gamers able to play on all types of platforms.  Gaming technology can often lead the way for other multi-platform behaviors as well, allowing for wide-market adoption of technologies that might otherwise remain outside the box for most consumers.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to gaming. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers answers to these and many other questions.

  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2011, TUP 2012