Tag Archives: Shopping

Are most home printers purchased where ink is? (MetaFAQs)

Our research shows that most home printers are purchased in one type of outlet, and ink bought somewhere else.

For home printers, Discount retail store such as Wal-Mart or Target and Consumer electronics stores such as Best Buy collectively account for nearly half of the outlets where home printers are purchased. By contrast, consumer electronics stores account for only one in nine home printer ink purchase outlets. Instead, half of printer ink outlets are Office supply retailers such as Office Depot and discount retail stores.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0009-2016-11-02_10-57-55

It’s a conflict that has been a conundrum for printer manufacturers for many years. Subscription services such as Hewlett Packard’s Instant Ink have started to change the formula. These programs bypass brick-and-mortar and online retailers alike to entice many printer users to simply buy direct. They also have the benefit to printer manufacturers of reducing consumer’s consideration of options for buying and using refilled ink.

This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapters with the most information about activities is the TUP 2016 Printers Chapter.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Printers, TUP 2016

Who spends most on tech – older or younger adults? (MetaFAQs)

In many tech circles, there’s a strong attention on the youngest adults. How true is it that younger adults spend more than older adults?

Our research shows that when it comes to household tech spending, age matters, although it’s not that simple.

First of all, while the youngest adults often are the most enthusiastic about technology, they don’t have the same financial means of older adults.

The majority of household tech spending is among adults age 30-39.metafacts-mqxxxx-tech-spending-x-age-2016-11-01_07-51-20

More importantly, when adjusting for employment status – including the self-employed – the analysis is clearer. Employed adults out-spend those not employed from ages 25 to 54.

There’s a “late life kicker” that’s important to note. After age 60, household tech spending is stronger among those not employed than those employed. Also, although employment rates decline with age, total household tech spending is stronger among the age 65-69 group than the age 55-59.

This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users. Specifically for this analysis, we looked at household tech spending along 15 categories of technology devices and services, from PCs, printers, and routers to Internet and mobile phone service.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapters with the most information about activities is the TUP 2016 User Profile Chapter, which includes sections more deeply analyzing by age and life stage.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Demographics & Econographics, Households, Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2016

What are the primary devices used for each category of activity? (MetaFAQs)

Smartphones are now the dominant device, although only slightly. In active use by 65% of Connected Adults, Tower Desktop PCs have effectively equal penetration at 64%. Notebook PCs aren’t far behind at 53%.

Interestingly, Smartphones are only the primary device for one type of activity – Communication. Even though Communication activities of one kind or another are being use by effectively all (99%) Connected Adults, it’s the only category of activities for which the Smartphone is the preferred device. For nearly every other type of activity, Tower Desktop PCs are the preferred device.

Among adults that use any Connected Device for Communication activities, 31% prefer to use a Smartphone, 12% prefer to use a Tower Desktop PC, and 6% prefer to use a Notebook PC. Communication activities includes voice calls, video calls, emails, chats and other forms.

Activities by Device - from Technology User Profile

Activities by Device – from Technology User Profile

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2014 edition. More can be found in the Activities chapter. The large-scale survey is in its 32nd continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.
For this MetaFAQs analysis, MetaFacts is sharing a portion of the answers to selected survey questions: specifically the Connected Devices in active use, and the types of activities each one is used for. The full TUP service includes further related details on the types and brands of devices, profiles of those who use Smartphones more than PCs and vice versa, detailed activities within each category and mapped to each device, and much more. The TUP survey gathers comprehensive details about the active usage of many consumer electronics products, including Printers, PC, Smartphones, Basic cell phones, and many other connected devices.

In addition to tracking activities, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about technology adoption, wireless technology, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

MetaFAQs – Frequently Asked Questions with answers supported by the facts: the MetaFacts.

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Filed under Behaviors and Activities, Consumer research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2014

Tech Spending Higher Among Showrooming Buyers

There’s an adage that shoppers vote with their feet, and it can be argued that with the increased use of Smartphones, shoppers are voting with their fingers. Retailers have long wrestled with the balance of generating traffic and having shoppers visit only to ultimately go buy somewhere else. This practice, sometimes called Showrooming, is mostly a reflection of the intelligence and desires of buyers. Using any Smartphones and either a specialized app or even a simple web browser, it’s much easier for consumers to compare prices and products while they are in a brick and mortar outlet.

It might be assumed that shoppers who use their Smartphones to compare products and pricing are low spenders. In fact, the opposite is true.

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

Based on recent primary research by MetaFacts as part of our Technology User Profile (TUP) service, we’ve found that tech spending levels are 37% higher among these careful buyers than the average Smartphone user. Furthermore, tech spending levels are 81% higher than the average Internet-connected adult.

These active buyers are also unique in many other ways, and augmented in-store comparison is an important and long-time growing trend to reckon with.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2013 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 31st continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.

For this analysis, MetaFacts is sharing the answers to two key survey questions. The TUP survey gathers tech spending levels for both tech products and ongoing tech services, and split out between types of consumer electronics, computers, imaging, Internet, and other categories. The survey also details what consumers actually do with their many tech devices, including the product and price comparison they do within retailers.

In addition to tracking the regular activities of Smartphones, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about retail or online shoppers, Smartphone users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

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Filed under Consumer research, TUP 2013, TUPdate

Buying Behavior – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about buying behavior is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

The retail adage: “buyers vote with their feet” is a reflection of old thinking, just as “new buyers vote with their mouse clicks” shows the same partial thinking. Up-to-date technology marketers and researchers know well how important it is to understand the full view of buyers. Consumers are influenced by many screens – and only having one view misses out on the true picture. After all, buyers have many choices and demonstrate time and time again their willingness to change.

Consumers have expanded, contracted, sidestepped, and evolved their buying behaviors. Retail has defied the proclamations of its doom and yet is not what it used to be. As tech buyers continue to change their tastes and preferences, they have tried many different types of channels. The changes are far from over.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to buying behavior. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • How do consumer attitudes about purchasing technology differ between Apple, Hewlett Packard and Dell customers?
  • To what extent do tech shoppers focus on certain channels for certain products versus staying with a smaller number of outlets?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • Where do people buy their printer supplies?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • Where are printer users buying their printer supplies? Are these the same channels as where they buy their printers?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How strong is name-brand dominance?
  • What is the frequency of printer consumables purchase?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • What other items (printers, software, monitors/displays, extended service plan, etc.) do people typically buy with their PC purchase?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies? How do Best Buy customers compare to Office Depot of Staples shoppers?
  • What’s typically bundled with a PC?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Beyond paper or plastic: which types of ink & toner are printer users buying? New or refilled? Original or competitor?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Used/Refurbished PCs – who buys them?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment? By tech spending behavior?

If solid answers to any of these example questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full datasets.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012