Tag Archives: Mobile

What is the penetration of home-owned computing devices? (MetaFAQs)

Mobile phones dominate home-owned connected devices as the ones used by the greatest number of U.S. adults. As of our MetaFacts TUP 2016 US survey, 87% of U.S. adults used a smartphone or basic cell phone that was home-owned. Slightly trailing mobile phones, 81% of adults use a home PC. Media tablets are a distant third place, at 63% of U.S. adults.

MetaFacts defines home-owned devices as those which were acquired with personal funds. As released in our other MetaFacts TUP research, a substantial share of U.S. adults also use employer-provided, self-employment, school-owned, public, or other devices which are owned by someone other than themselves.metafacts-mq0137-250-dev_key-2017-02-22_09-32-36

Within mobile phones, home-owned smartphones outnumber home-owned basic cell phones, with nearly two-thirds (72%) of U.S. adults using a smartphone and just over one-fourth (27%) using a basic cell phone.

Among home PCs, desktops and Microsoft Windows PCs dominate. Home notebooks have grown to reach almost half (49%) of U.S. adults. Although the tech-savvy consider Windows XP and Vista PCs to be passé and even dangerously unprotected from malware, 4% of U.S. adults are still actively using Home PCs with these operating systems. While adoption of tech products can often be rapid, retirement of older technology from the active installed base can take much longer than many may expect.

Among home media tablets, tablets such as Apple’s iPad have higher penetration than e-Book Readers such as Amazon’s Kindles.

Looking ahead, we expect slowing growth rates for PCs, mobile, phones, and tablets as happens when penetration approaches market saturation. Certain life stage market segments are likely to keep their basic cell phones active for years, partly delaying a shift due to perceptions of smartphones being complex or expensive, and partly due to simple inertia. This will further reinforce smartphones as being a replacement market. Home PC penetration rates have not declined measurably as an increasing number of customers switch between desktops, notebooks or convertibles, and newer all-in-one form factors. The penetration of tablets, while recently tapering, may see a resurgence should a broader class of tech users discover that they can do enough of their preferred activities on tablets. We expect the majority of home tablet users to be from within those who are already using smartphones and PCs.

Source

This MetaFAQ #mq0137 is based on TUP 2016 US table 250 DEV_KEYxLIFE – 2016 Key Devices by Life Stage . This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users.

Many other related research answers are part of the TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP sections with the most information about home device penetration are the Technology User Profile Chapter and the Devices Chapter.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Related Resources

  • Chapter A User Profile
    • Section: A1-OV/Overview
    • Section: A2-DE/Demographic Overview
    • Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage
    • Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges
    • Section: A9-AGEGEN/Age, Gender
  • Chapter D Devices
    • Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations
    • Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems
    • Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS
  • Chapter E PCs
    • Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs

Related MetaFAQs

 

MetaFAQ Question Cross-Reference
mq0037 What is the average number of Printers used by Home PC users? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [410 PRxHFPC] Printers
mq0039 Who owns the printers millennials use at a higher rate than average? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A9-AGEGEN/Age, Gender  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGEGEN] Key Device Metrics
mq0063 Who are the Apple-only users? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_ECO] Respondent Demographics
mq0091 What is the percent of Home PC users that use printers? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE] Key Device Metrics
mq0213 How does the penetration of OS Ecosystems vary by device type? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDEV_ECO] Key Device Metrics
mq0218 Is there an age skew for Windows 7 Home PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGE] Key Device Metrics
mq0220 Is there an age skew for Apple iPads? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGE] Key Device Metrics
mq0236 What is the average number of Home PCs being used? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [490 UNITSxLIFE] Units
mq0237 What is the average number of Home Tablets being used? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [490 UNITSxLIFE] Units
mq0254 Are Smartphone users more or less likely to be using a Tablet PC? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [340 TABxOV] Tablet PCs
mq0257 Which Life Stage segment spends the most on tech devices and services? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [790 SPENDxLIFE] Tech Spending
mq0345 Are older or younger employees more likely to use Desktop PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [150 USAGExOV] Usage Profile
mq0365 What is the mix of devices that people actively use? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [150 USAGExOV] Usage Profile
mq0473 Which are the leading OS for actively-used Home PCs? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [830 HPCxHFPC] Home PCs
mq0507 Which age group has the highest usage of Notebook PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A2-DE/Demographic Overview  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDE] Key Device Metrics
mq0569 How do the 1st and 2nd-most popular combination of devices compare in average number of devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [490 UNITSxCOMBO] Units
mq0588 How many Home PCs were acquired Used/Refurbished? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [830 HPCxHFPC] Home PCs
mq0643 Which segments use the most connected devices? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [490 UNITSxOV] Units
mq0674 How many adults use a Windows device? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_ECO] Universe-Online Adults
mq0676 How many adults use a Smartphone using Apple iOS, Google Android, or Windows? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics
mq0677 How many adults use a Tablet using Apple iOS, Google Android, or Windows? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics

 

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Filed under Basic cell phones, Consumer research, Convertibles, Desktops, Devices, e-Book Readers, Market Research, Market Sizing, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Smartphones, Statistics, Tablets, TUP 2016

Footloose and ad-free – a new classic melody?

Digital Music Listening – by Dan Ness
Pleasure or pain? Attraction or avoidance? These are some tradeoffs consumers make as they choose how to use their tech devices and services, and music is a major part.

Consumers love music and have more listening options and platforms than ever. The evolution of digital music listening continues to transform the recording, advertising, and tech industries, and the changes aren’t over. At this point, the net effect is a larger than ever base of active music fans and listeners, and one that is engaged in discovering both the new and old. Many consumers are also being trained that advertising is something they can pay to avoid – whether for their music, TV, or news.

Music streaming services such as Apple Music, Pandora, and Spotify have disrupted influence, control, and the flow of royalties and fees between listeners and artists. At the same time, the total audience had broadened beyond few passionate fans, and younger generations are discovering both classic and new artists. There’s new life in the long tail of older and obscure recorded music.tdmusic-stream-local-by-device-2016-12-01_13-08-02

Accessibility and ease of use has substantially increased the base of music listeners. This has beneficial long-term effects for both the music and tech industries, and perhaps less so for advertising.

Digital music listening is widespread – being a regular activity of three quarters (76%) of connected adults, whether through portable MP3 players, music services, players on Smartphones, PCs, or Tablets, or often across more than one of these.

Half of connected adults listen to music locally downloaded to their PC, Tablet, or Smartphone. A larger number – 57% – listen to music through a free or paid streaming service. Free service users outnumber those paying by 66%. More consumers are signing up for paid services as these services experiment with additional features and family plans. Avoiding advertisements is one reason listeners choose the paid plans. Use of Ad-Blocking software by listeners to streaming music services is 20% to 40% higher than average, with Smartphone ad blocking rates relatively stronger among listeners.tdmusic-adblocking-rates-2016-12-01_16-38-10

Listening levels varies by device type. Smartphones outnumber PCs and Tablets in the number of active listeners, and has also surpassed portable MP3 players, which are being actively used by 27% of Connected Adults. Al though music-listening apps are simple enough to add to Smartphones, many listeners still prefer a separate device that is tuned to one task – mobile music listening.

Digital music listening is skewed towards younger adults, while a few older adults cling to their turntables to play vinyl albums. Although Millennials (age 18-35) make up 39% of Connected Adults, they are nearly half (49%) of those listening to music on their connected devices, through streaming services, or using digital music players.tdmusic-music-listeners-by-age-group-2016-12-01_14-43-12

Apple’s iTunes and iPod market entry fifteen years ago is still paying dividends for Apple, with Apple notebook users being 22% more likely than average to be listening through a connected device or standalone player, and 30% more likely than average to be using a music service.

Otherwise, music listeners don’t favor one type of connected device over any other for their other non-musical entertainment activities. Fun is big across their collection of Smartphones, Tablets, and PCs. Instead, entertainment is important in all that they use. Music listeners are 32% more likely than average to be using the broadest number of entertainment activities.

Household technology spending is somewhat higher among music listeners. Annual spending for digital music listeners is 11% higher than among average connected adults. However, spending on digital content is much higher than average. Those who use music services spend 40% more than average consumers on digital content such as music and eBooks.tdmusic-tech-spending-2016-12-02_09-04-39

Looking ahead, we expect continued widespread music listening. Consumer habits change slower than their dances between services and platforms. Most future growth will come from within the current base as they spread their usage across their devices and move to paid plans. Less growth will come from first-time listeners. Also, we expect further market disruption for pure music services and advertisers. Social networks will likely seek ways to further leverage their many interconnected users and more deeply integrate music sharing into their services. The growing anti-advertisement sentiment may continue as consumers continue to see value in spending a few nickels to avoid what they see as disturbances to their musical reveries.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). Trend information is based on prior waves. For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

The TUP 2016 Wearables, Hearables, Listening, and Speaking Chapter details music listening devices, services, and activities, wearables and other key analysis points. The TUP 2016 Consumer Electronics Chapter drills down into a comprehensive collection of devices and services in active use.

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Filed under Cloud Storage, Desktops, Entertainment, Market Research, Notebooks, Smartphones, TUP 2016, TUPdate

Wireless Tablet Printing (MetaFAQs)

In tech, mobility means many things – lighter devices, a range of devices to choose from to fit the activity and location, better connections between the devices, and fewer cables. In essence, it means making everything easier so users can do what they want to do wherever they are.

Wireless Tablet Printing

Tablets have grown in acceptance among many users in part due to having larger screens than Smartphones, while having more mobility than notebooks or desktops.

To fully enjoy tablets’ mobility, the connection between tablets and printers is best done with no cable tethering users down. So, wireless printing emerged, and in several ways: using WiFi for a nearby printer, emailing to a printer, or using a service.

However, have consumers taken advantage of wireless printing?

Nearly a third of tablets regularly print to a nearby printer using WiFi. Fewer print using a email or an online service.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active Tablet and Printer users.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapter with the most information about the users Tablets is the TUP 2016 Tablets Chapter and more about Printers and printing activities is in the TUP 2016 Printer Chapter.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Market Research, MetaFAQs, Printers, Tablets, TUP 2016, Usage Patterns

3D Printers are not for the youngest, yet (MetaFAQs)

3D Printers continue to rank strongly as one of the up-and-coming tech items of the future.

Planning to buy a 3D Printer - by age

Planning to buy a 3D Printer – by age

3D Printers loom as disruptive to many industries. Why would Amazon need drones or UPS need trucks when a product’s design can speed along the Internet to consumers making their own goods? Why would repair parts manufacturers require vast warehouses when do-it-yourselfers can simply create their own spare parts as they need them?

While 3D printing technology is still in its early stages for many types of goods, materials and printers are quickly improving and becoming more accessible to a broader public.

How real is market demand for 3D printers, though? Based on our recent survey of 7,336 respondents with the TUP 2016 survey, the market is small and selective.

Are the early adopters and interest bearers of 3D printing the youngest adults? No, the majority of purchase plans are among adults 30-34, followed closely by those age 35-39. The younger age 18-24 and age 25-29 group lag behind.

The number of active 3D Printer users and intenders is still relatively small, yet change is afoot.

Among consumers, we expect the adoption of 3D printers to continue among tech hobbyists or service bureaus. Even the technically inclined Etsy crafters are only slowly adopting the technology themselves, although they’re the group most bearing watching. They have the creativity and know how to make it pay for them to keep updating their technology.

About this MetaFAQ

In addition to profiling the spending, demographics, activities, and devices of these users, many other related answers are part of the TUP service, available to paid subscribers.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from the most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under 3D Printers, Consumer research, Forward-Leaning, MetaFAQs, Printers, TUP 2016, Usage Patterns

Bluetooth Headsets – for the youngest? (MetaFAQs)

metafaqs_an16_160913_bluetooth_user_age_162016-09-13_09-44-50

36.3 = the average age of Bluetooth Headset users in the US, per TUP Wave #34, the Technology User Profile 2016 survey

With the recent release of Apple’s iPhone 7, there has been extra attention on wireless Bluetooth headsets. This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions about who is already using wireless Bluetooth headsets.While the average age of users is 7 years younger than the average Connected Adult in the US, most of the usage is among adults age 25-44, and not as strongly among the all-important 18-24 age group.

Many other related answers are part of the TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapter with the most information about the users of wearables and hearables is the TUP 2016 Wearables, Hearables, Listening, and Speaking Chapter

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Communication, Consumer research, Demographics & Econographics, Entertainment, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Smartphones, TUP 2016