Tag Archives: iPod

Privacy is on the mind of savvy early adopters as they resist location sharing – A MetaFacts TUPdate

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

Are early adopters starting to act like laggards? It may seem a paradox that the most forward-thinking consumers – the first to adopt smartphones – would also be the ones more strongly avoiding unique smartphone features.

The true answer is that consumers are more complex and intelligent than simplistic adoption curve analysis suggests. In choosing mobile phones, they are navigating between the sirens and rocks of enticing deals, identity theft, entertainment, carrier signal strength (or weakness), desire for social connections, misinformation, privacy, trust, and much more.

When it comes to data security & privacy, most Smartphone users express concern and corresponding action. A higher share of Smartphone than Basic Mobile Phone users take steps to protect their security and privacy, including disabling some features.

Privacy Concerns for Smartphones and Basic Mobile Phones

Location services have been integral to Smartphones and Feature Phones for years and most handsets give subscribers the option to minimize tracking. However, recent widely publicized breaches have brought this closer to the forefront of consumer’s buying behavior.

Age and gender alone do not truly define the privacy-aware from others; correcting for age shows that tech experience matters. Most Smartphone users today have more tech experience than average users, so are savvy about settings and controls and have privacy and security concerns for PCs which are inherited by their Smartphones.

App developers which assume settings will be on by default, such as location identification, will encounter market resistance. Privacy and Security are issues which can suddenly inflame public sentiment. Even though customers may have read agreements and adjusted their privacy & security settings, many have an expectation of being private and secure.

Consumers vote with their responses, as well as their fingers and wallets. Building (or rebuilding) trust is a widespread issue, and certainly not only in the U.S. Each participant in the ecosystem of handling personally identifiable information has their part to play if location-based services and mobile payments are to flourish and last longer than fads. MetaFacts expects that privacy and security will continue to stay a concern among many consumers with reported breaches beyond those specifically on Smartphones – from identify theft to Wikileaks reports.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. In our most recent wave of Technology User Profile, we surveyed American adults about their use of mobile phones, technology attitudes, and many other behavioral and socioeconomic factors. Current TUP subscribers can access and drill down more deeply into this phenomenon using TUP Interactive Access or with their datasets.

We started this analysis by first looking at the answers from 8,175 U.S. respondents in the Technology User Profile service and then drilled down further into their profiles to get a more complete picture.

Contact MetaFacts to access the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically.

These editions are for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals who want a solid resource they can use immediately after industry events such as mergers, or even use prior to anticipated events, can license direct access to TUP.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010, TUPdate

Amazon Cloud Drive may rain on Apple while lightening load for consumers

Early Adopter

Today, Amazon announced the Amazon Cloud Drive and Amazon Cloud Player for Web. This game-changing move will likely bring a boost to the decades-old online file storage services. It may even have the effect of reining in music listeners who may have strayed, since the player will evidently only support purchased songs.

We took a quick look into the MetaFacts Technology User Profile research and discovered several challenges ahead for Amazon and others planning to follow suit, as well as some elements that show Amazon is in the right place at the right time with the right offering.

First of all, more Amazon shoppers alread use online cloud storage than non-shoppers. This means these consumers may be predisposed to cloud-based storage which is an advantage for Amazon. However, if the consumers currently using cloud storage are focused more on file backup and file/folder synchronization services, these don’t appear to be in Amazon’s initial offering.

Also, more Amazon shoppers use a portable MP3 player than online onsumers who don’t regularly shop on Amazon. While Apple’s iPod has the highest share among MP3 players, it’s share isn’t markedly different among Amazon’s shoppers than non-shoppers

In fact, Amazon’s shoppers are already active music-listeners, being well above average in music downloading and listening to streaming audio.

They are also more active using social networks, as well as sharing photos and videos through networks like Facebook, or through sites like HP Snapfish.

Meanwhile, among users of cloud storage services, Apple’s footprint is substantially higher than among non-cloud users. Further, users of cloud storage skew younger than Amazon’s current clientele. This could have the effect of drawing in younger customers to Amazon’s customer base, or may be ignored by Amazon’s relatively older and less cloud-savvy customers.

Cloud storage users have a higher share of Smartphone use than non-users, with higher shares for use of RIM Blackberry, Windows Phone, Apple iPhones and Android Smartphones.

Because most consumers may not know that Amazon has supported back-end cloud storage for many other technology firms, consumers are likely to raise concerns about Amazon’s experience and security capabilities.

Interested tech marketers and researchers may contact MetaFacts for licensing information.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through customized report. Also, you may obtain the related MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition Report, which covers the broader range of key trends, by contacting MetaFacts. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals who want a solid resource they can use immediately after industry events such as mergers, or even use prior to anticipated events, can license direct access to TUP.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, TUP 2010, TUPdate

Internet – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about the internet and the ways people use it is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Not all access to the Internet is equal and consumers know it – voting with their fingers. In today’s multi-platform age, computers are not the only way online, and email may be losing ground as the king of activities.  Are fun, compelling, and emerging technologies making PCs a thing of the past?  Is social networking replacing snailish email?

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to internet use. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides a comprehensive source to answer the following questions, as well as many others.

  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Droid and blackberry users?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • Is email dying because of ads? Being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • How do ad volumes affect usage?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers?  For which activities?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many?
  • Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Which segments are utilizing the cloud? For which activities?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using and planning to use?
  • How are users incorporating digital images, through the use of digital cameras, scanners, downloading images, as well as how are they producing output?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • Which types of software (packages and SaaS) are used and intended for near-term use? (apps, appstore)
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

Gaming with PCs, Consoles, and Handhelds — solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about gaming is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

It’s so easy when you know the rules – so goes Queen’s 1980 power ballad.  These days the rules may be changing all the time, with gamers able to play on all types of platforms.  Gaming technology can often lead the way for other multi-platform behaviors as well, allowing for wide-market adoption of technologies that might otherwise remain outside the box for most consumers.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to gaming. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers answers to these and many other questions.

  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using and planning to use?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Are some countries more game-oriented than others?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Are youngsters abandoning (traditional) TV?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • What’s the expected market demand for a Google Droid – Verizon – Motorola trio?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do you get one again, if you do?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How do consumer attitudes about purchasing technology differ between Apple, Hewlett Packard and Dell customers?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows, and Blackberry users?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which social networking sites dominate? How does this vary by country and demographic group?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

Music – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about digital music and which people do and don’t use it is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Victor Hugo said many years ago: “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.” Technology marketers and researchers know how important music is to so many people.

As fickle music-listening consumers continue to change their tastes and preferences, music has been instrumental in encouraging them to try many different types of technology. In particular, music has been the hit to draw consumers through adoption of some products and services, only to abandon those for newer disruptive offerings. The changes are far from over.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to digital music. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies and services are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • iPhone users – who are they really?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • How many smartphone users listen to music using their smartphone in addition to their MP3 player such as an Apple iPod?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using and planning to use?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone (in the consumer’s eyes)
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Which gaming platform dominates with which market segment?
  • How many online adults use dial-up to go online, and which countries stand out?
  • One to a customer? How often are PCs shared?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which web portals are used most frequently?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Most-mobile customers – where they go and what they do
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • How do the segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • What’s typically bundled with a PC?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Which platforms offer the best opportunity for particular activities? How do segments vary?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of the Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Technology, TUP 2009