Tag Archives: iPhone

Mobile Phones – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about mobile phones is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Both smartphone and basic feature phones today are much more than a phone.  At least, they can be.  With all the capabilities of the modern mobile device, it can be difficult to discern what exactly which consumers are after which capabilities, and what they ultimately use.  Do they use their phone for the texting, for the web, or as a PDA?  As a camera or a gaming tool?  Or do they use it mostly as a traditional telephone?  These questions beg for extensive answers that only careful, detailed market research can provide.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to mobile phones. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides answers to these and many other key questions.

  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary? How does compare to Tablets and other key devices?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones? How about from tablets?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Which segments are using which tech devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • Tracfone for oldsters? Who has the oldest segment by carrier?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • How many display screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How do Verizon’s subscribers compare to AT&T’s?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How strong is name-brand dominance?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Which key tech devices are consumers planning to buy? Which segments show the strongest plans and how does this compare to their tech spending?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Navigation, online maps, location-based mobile phone services, and GPS – who’s getting directions?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Busy Mobiles Profile Report, Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Music – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about digital music and which people do and don’t use it is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Victor Hugo said many years ago: “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.” Technology marketers and researchers know how important music is to so many people.

As fickle music-listening consumers continue to change their tastes and preferences, music has been instrumental in encouraging them to try many different types of technology. In particular, music has been the hit to draw consumers through adoption of some products and services, only to abandon those for newer disruptive offerings. The changes are far from over.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to digital music. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies and services are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users? What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of the Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Technology, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Video calling passes one in five Smartphone callers, lead by Apple (TUPtip)

(a TUPtip from MetaFacts – October 4, 2012)

Video calling is a regular activity for one in five (20%) American online adults with Smartphones, MetaFacts finds in the 2012 wave of Technology User Profile. Users of Apple iPhones are 48% more likely than average to be doing so. Among major Smartphone brands, Motorola and LG smartphone users have the lowest video-calling rates.

Among major carriers, Sprint Smartphone subscribers are 62% more likely than average Smartphone subscribers to be video-calling.

Current Technology User Profile 2012 subscribers can access this information in the Mobile Phones and Smartphone sections of the Mobile Phones Chapter, or use MarketSight to dive more deeply into which market segments have the highest and lowest penetration.

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Filed under Behaviors and Activities, Statistics, TUP 2012, TUPtip, Video calling

Two-thirds of Online Adults Use Three or More Tech Devices, According to MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2012

Two-thirds of Online Adults Use Three or More Tech Devices, According to MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2012

Smartphones Not Replacing PCs

A MetaFacts Press Release –

ENCINITAS, CA (October 3, 2012)  Use of multiple tech devices is widespread, with 65% of online adults regularly using three or more desktops, notebooks, netbooks, tablets, eBook readers, smartphones, or basic feature phones, according to the 2012 Technology User Profile survey from MetaFacts, Inc.

“Nearly one in five online adults use five or more devices, and Netbooks, eBook Readers, and Tablets have reached the majority of these busy tech-jugglers,” said Dan Ness, Principal Analyst at MetaFacts. “As many adults have 4 devices, with Notebooks, Smartphones, and Desktops dominating. For 3-device users, the most common profile is two PCs and a mobile phone. The favorite combination among 2-device adults is the trusty desktop and basic feature phone.”

“Tech-jugglers with 5+ devices include males age 18-24 at double the national rate, males age 25-34 at 82% higher, and males age 35-44 at 32% higher,” said Dan Ness, Principal Analyst at MetaFacts.  “Females age 18-24 are 42% higher than average with this rich of a tech collection.”

In related findings, MetaFacts reports that Smartphones have not replaced PCs. Smartphone subscribers use many more PCs than users of Basic feature phones.

“Smartphones have quickly captured American’s ears, yet they have not fully enticed their fingers and eyes” said Dan Ness, Principal Analyst at MetaFacts. “Instead, the Smartphone activities of American adults overlap and augment much of what they do with their Desktop and Mobile PCs.“

MetaFacts also finds that the number of online adults using Smartphones is nearing the number using Basic feature phones.

“The Smartphone market is being bolstered by former Basic feature phone users,” said Ness, “even while former Smartphones subscribers convert to Basic phones. Furthermore, Smartphone replacement rates are high.”

Other key findings announced today from the 2012 Technology User Profile survey include:

  • Early adopters of mobile phones use the broadest mix of tech devices
  • RIM Smartphone users are more likely to be the biggest tech spenders
  • Facebook users have lower levels of activity, content creation, and engagement than users of other key social networks
  • While Millennials print photos, adult education, and documents from their tablets, GenX print children’s educational documents and Boomers print maps/directions and financials
  • RIM & Windows Smartphone users state the strongest entitlement to text or email while driving
  • Former mobile phone subscribers rate customer service poor and lack of signal an issue

The full 2012 Technology User Profile results are available immediately. Technology companies can subscribe to multiple waves for in-depth trend comparison. For deeper market sizing, segmentation, and analysis, subscribers can license TUP datasets in statistical formats SPSS or SAS, use the easy-to-use survey analysis platform from MarketSight, or retain MetaFacts for custom inquiries. MetaFacts also offers complimentary TUPdates, which give periodic insights on topics and findings.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. Our Technology User Profile (TUP) survey uses solid methods to deliver quick, customized answers. TUP spans a wide range of consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, Smartphones, printers, peripherals, mobile devices, and related services and products. For more information, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300 or www.metafacts.com.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, Mobile Phones, Multiple-PC Household, Press Release, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2012

Renegade Distracted Drivers

By Dan Ness, Principal Analyst, MetaFacts

Will “the land of the free and the home of the brave” refer to driving? Who are the defiant drivers who insist on their right to drive while texting or sending an email?

Almost any driver in the US has noticed other drivers driving erratically. Many are distracted by one thing or another. Asked whether they feel that they themselves should be able to use tech products while driving, most adults agree they should not. However, some maintain they have that right.

There are 15.3 million Americans, or 9% of online adults, who agree or strongly agree that they “should be allowed to text or email while I am driving a car.” Many U.S. states have enacted laws against this activity, yet this attitude of entitlement persists. One year ago, our survey found the same level of self-justification – 9%. Understanding these defiant communicators can help marketers, tech developers, and other interested parties seeking to help their safety and those driving near them.

A picture of pirate renegades emerges – a segment which may be tough to reach. Lawless defiance is not limited to using phones where they please. These righteous independents intend to abandon their wireless carrier (index 541), are using the Internet less because of advertising (index 451), seek privacy by turning off mobile phone location services and avoiding certain apps (index 262), and find it acceptable to use unlicensed software at home (index 247).

Of dozens of demographics characteristics, one unique aspect: they are four times as likely to be male age 25-34. Demographics alone don’t define this group.

They’re ahead of the pack in using cloud services, indexing 300 or higher in Internet file/folder synchronization, remote PC access, and sharing music playlists. The same goes for sharing their videos online and making international VoIP calls, both with an index of 349.

Texting and emailing are the only things they do with their mobile phones. Those with smartphones are well above average in using them to watch television, make video calls, buy something, make status updates, save voice memos, and redeem coupons.

Although they are ahead of the pack in using their smartphones, they were the last in their class to adopt technology. They are mobile phone laggards and PC laggards, which means they were in the last 16% of their age group to buy their first PC or mobile phone.

Looking ahead

I expect that there will be a lot of resistance from wireless operators, handset makers, app developers, and most of the tech industry. Consumers, too, will resist laws and any challenges to their sense of freedom. Most want to be able to use what tech products they have anywhere and anytime, regardless of the consequences.  Having watched people adopt tech product for over 30 years, I’m optimistic there will be technological solutions. These will be supported by the majority who acknowledge that the specific combination of driving and communicating is over the line.

It took untold years to reach smokers, even after the relationships between smoking and adverse health effects were widely known. Will the fast-moving tech industry set a record in protecting its customers? I hope so, and evidently most of us agree as well.

Source

The information in this TUPdate is drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile research service. Current TUP subscribers may submit an inquiry or use the TUP Interactive Access tool to drill further down into the TUP datasets. Others who are interested may contact MetaFacts.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals can license direct access to TUP.

Methodological note

There is a well-known factor in survey research called social desirability bias. Respondents are known to answer some types of questions differently depending on the setting and who is asking them. To minimize this affect, we included attitudinal questions in a battery of other unrelated questions. Also, we allowed respondents to complete the survey online and anonymously, since this effect is lessened in self-administered surveys over answering by telephone or face to face with what they may see as authority figures.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing syndicated original research on the market shifts, trends and consumer profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology products and services. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, Smartphones, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under TUP 2011