Tag Archives: Households

Where mobile PCs are actually used

Mobile PCs are used in a variety of locations, with living rooms ranking as the top location for 62% of mobile PCs. Desktops are less-often used in living rooms, only being the location of one-fifth (19%) of desktops.Bedrooms of adults are the second-ranked location for mobile PCs, ostensibly to afford privacy, quiet, or convenience to the user. These make up three of seven (42%) of locations for mobile PCs.

Home offices are only ranked third for mobile PCs, with 38% of mobile PCs being used there regularly. Slightly more – 39% – of desktops occupy home offices.

Locations for Mobile & Desktop PCs in Homes - Mobile PC Brand Profile Report

Locations for Mobile & Desktop PCs in Homes – Mobile PC Brand Profile Report

Other findings in the Mobile PC Profile Report include:

Brand Shares of Mobile & Desktop PCs
Mobile PC Brands by Year Acquired
Market Segments and Mobile PC Brands
Operating Systems & Mobility
Operating Systems on Mobile PCs – Pre-installed or Aftermarket?
Operating Systems by Mobile PC Brand
User Age and Mobile Computing
User Age and Mobile PC Brand
User Gender and Mobile PC Brand
Age within Gender of Primary Computer User and Mobile PC Brand
Number of Locations by Gender and Age
Employment Status and Mobile Computing
Employment Status and Mobile PC Brands
Market Segment by Mobile PC Brand
Big & Small Companies and PC Mobility
Educational Level and Mobile PC Brand
Household Income by Mobile PC Brand
Age of Kids and Mobility of PC
Mobility Doesn’t Always Mean Mobile Use
Locations for Mobile PCs
Public PC Locations by Mobile PC Brand
Mobile PC Brand by Number of Locations Used
Mobile PC Users and the Total Number of PCs Used
Mobile PC Brand by Number of PCs Regularly Used
PC Purchase Year by Mobility
New versus Used/Refurbished by Mobile PC Brand
Hours of Use by Mobile PC Brand
Busy Mobile PCs and Mobile PC Brands
Activities and Mobility
Major Activities Point Out that Mobile PC Brands Vary
Tech Attitude Gap between Mobile PC and Desktop Users
Tech Attitudes by Mobile PC Brand
Brand Loyalty by Mobile PC Brand
Scanners by Mobile PC Brand
Docking Solutions by Mobile PC Brand
Firewire Usage by Mobile PC Brand
Sony Mobile PC Users Shop at a Broader Selection of Outlets
Which Mobile PC Users Frequent which Online and Retail Outlets
Retail Purchase Channels & Outlets by Mobile PC Brand
Online Purchase Channels & Outlets by Mobile PC Brand

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Windows Vista, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry topics. These Profile Reports are in a series on specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption and use in American households and businesses. Interested technology professionals can sign up for complimentary TUPdates, periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a national market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are widely recognized as a primary marketing resource for Fortune 1000 companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, peripherals, mobile computing, and related services and products. For more information, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, TUP 2008

Household employment and operating system

Full-time employment equates in having a newer Windows operating system and at least one Apple Home PC.

  •  Two-thirds (61%) of Vista households have family members that are employed full time.
  • Two-thirds (60%) of households that have at least one Apple Home PC have family members that are employed full time.
  • One-fifth (17%) of Older Windows Households have family members that are self-employed.
  • One-third (33%) of Older Windows Households have family members that are not employed outside the home.
  • A fourth (23%) of Older Windows Households have retired family members.
More Older Windows Households have members that are not employed outside the home - Home Operating Systems Profile Report

More Older Windows Households have members that are not employed outside the home – Home Operating Systems Profile Report

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Other findings in the MetaFacts Operating Systems Profile Report include:

  • Operating System Landscape
    • Multi-PC and Multi-OS Households
  • Home Operating Systems and Demographics
    • Having children in the household does make a difference for Vista
    • Household employment and operating system
    • Education level and operating system within the household
    • Annual household income and operating system
    • People age 18-34 are using more Apple primary home PCs than older people
  • Purchase Channels
    • Apple gets a bigger share of direct sales than Windows PCs
  • PC Brands & Operating Systems
    • New PC brands bought by operating system
    • Total installed base for all primary home PCs shows some movement from the big brands in the new PC market
  • Changes in PC Form Factors – Laptops are coming on strong as new primary PC form factor
  • How Different Operating Systems are Used Differently
    • Email is the most frequent activity of users on all primary home PCs
    • New primary home PC user activities
  • Operating Systems and Other Consumer Electronics
    • Handheld device use and operating system of the household
    • Imaging behavior and household operating system
    • Television viewing habits and operating system in the household
    • Convenience is the key for households that have at least one Apple Home PC
    • Some Older Windows Households are planning to upgrade while still taking advantage of older technology
  • Technology Attitudes and Operating Systems
    • Attitudes of adult PC users vary with operating system

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Windows Vista, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Broadband, Digital Imaging, and many other technology industry topics. These Profile Reports are in a series on specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption and use in American households and businesses. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates, periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a national market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are widely recognized as a primary marketing resource for Fortune 1000 companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, peripherals, mobile computing, and related services and products. For more information, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300 or www.metafacts.com

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, TUP 2008

Second Home PCs, Now Mainstream, Linked to Buying Plans

Like many younger siblings or poorer cousins, if the second home computer had feelings, it might feel a little left behind. It’s certainly not as complete as the favorite one. It doesn’t have as rich an ability to play or share music, videos, or to perform other popular activities. Many consumers, however, are considering upgrading their older home PC or buying a new replacement.The two-PC home is finally official: today, over half (51.6%) of households with a home PC have two or more PCs. Nearly one in five (19.3%) U.S. households have three or more home PCs.

Why is this important?

Companies that offer peripherals or software for PCs need to consider the pent-up upgrade demand in multiple-PC households. Also, PC makers and retailers that limit their vision to only selling one PC at a time, might expand their thinking to consider providing solutions specifically tailored to multiple-PC households.

First of all, the second computer isn’t as musical, even though consumers want it to be. Just over a quarter (28.6%) of households with a second home PC have external speakers compared with more than half (52.3%) on the first PC. However, demand is high with external speakers ranking tops as the most-often planned peripheral purchase, reported among nearly half (45.7%) of multi-PC households.

Scanners are also stronger on the plan-to-buy list than what’s currently installed. Almost one-sixth (15.6%) of second home PCs have a scanner, yet nearly three-in-ten (28.3%) of multi-PC households are planning to buy one soon.

DVD-RW/DVD-R drives are also hot. Although only installed on one-tenth (10.5%) of second home PCs, plans outpace installations. Plans are higher at one in six (16.4%) for DVD-RW/DVD-R and one in seven (14.6%) for DVD-ROM drives. People just want to be able to watch their movies!

Perhaps a surprise, as the numbers are small if steady, is that external microphones and PC headsets still have their share. Even while only one in sixteen (6.8%) second home PCs have an external microphone, nearly double that rate plan an external microphone (11.8%), a PC headset with no microphone (8.6%) or PC headset with microphone (8.5%).

As the two-PC household now has reached mainstream status, the difference between home computers is noticeable to consumers. Music and movies are two activities that really make the difference, and will either result in consumers following through on their plans to upgrade existing PCs, or to just replace the PCs they already have. In either case, these differences represent a discontent that is driving consumers to action, and it remains to be seen who among PC vendors, peripheral vendors, or retailers will best meet this opportunity.

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TUPdates: The Fastest Online Get Busier While The Rest Get Left Behind

Broad public awareness about the Digital Divide was only a warm-up drill – a substantial group of Americans are now being left even further behind. While the growing economic and educational divide get lots of coverage, less attention has been given to the implications of the growing rift between the fast-connected and slow-connected. Furthermore, broadband adoption has stalled among the heaviest online users.

Why is this important?

Product planners, technologists, consumer marketers, governments, and even pollsters that imagine that all Internet users are high-speed and equal are missing the mark. The very people they are trying to reach with rich, streaming music or video content are a subset of the market and while growing in numbers, have dropped as a percent of those online. While broadband-attached users are increasing their time online, the ranks of dial-up users have swelled and are spending less time online. Internet users without fast, persistent connections might even pull the plug out of frustration.

According to the current edition of Technology User Profile, the longest-running large-scale technology survey conducted in the U.S., this year marks the first time in recent history that more than two-thirds (66.9%) of home Internet users with broadband connections spent 11 or more hours online per week. This is up from 62.9% in 2003. Also, heavy users have increased their hours online, rising from 34.8% of home PCs in 2003 to 38.5% in 2004. The study surveyed 10,418 computer users and asked them how many hours they spent actively on the Internet during a typical week at home.

This may appear to be rosy news for broadband providers, validating that users like what they see and therefore increase their usage. However, not all of the news is positive.

Light users, those with less than 11 hours online per week, have precipitously declining broadband adoption rates, dropping from 30.2% in 2003 to less than a quarter (24.2%) in 2004. At this point, this is due more to the entrance of new users that typically don’t spend as much time online and that don’t start with broadband connections, than being due to broadband users pulling the plug.

By comparison, moderate users (11 or more hours per week) and heavy users (21 or more hours per week) had flat broadband adoption rates. Moderate users remained flat with 46.9% having broadband in 2003 and 46.4% in 2004. Broadband adoption by heavy users was also flat, with 51.5% in 2003 and 51.6% in 2004. So, it is not as if the heaviest dial-up users are making the move to broadband.

Other factors at play are multiple-PC households, wireless networks, and the growing adoption of computer and online use by ever-younger users.

This mixed news may come as a shock to those that believe that everyone is high-bandwidth like them. It means that further shocks may crop up when those expecting nothing but growth find that they face declining numbers. Identifying those segments that are at risk of reducing their use and catering to their unique needs may help avoid such declines.

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TUPdates: Average American Means PC Ownership , Internet Connection…Almost

Almost three-fifths of American households own a PC, and nearly all of those households have some kind of Internet connectivity. However, the rate of broadband Internet use is much lower-about 27 percent of American homes have such a connection, or 46 percent of PC owners. The flip side is that there are still tens of millions of Americans who have never owned a PC. Furthermore, some groups of Americans have less than half the adoption rate of other Americans.

Why is this important?

Anyone that believes that all Americans are home computer users with fast, broadband Internet connections are just barely a quarter right. More importantly, there is a persistent gap between the connected and disconnected, with some market segments having five times the adoption rate of others.

These are some of the insights culled from the latest research undertaken by MetaFacts, Inc., based on responses to questionnaires submitted by 32,130 U.S. households. The responses showed that about 58 percent of U.S. homes own a PC, representing 64.3 million households. The most likely to own a computer are the affluent empty nesters and older SINKs (single income no kids), whose rate is 25 percent higher than average. The least likely are the single heads of households who are 75 or older; whose rate is 40 percent less than average. But, interestingly, almost all other groups are within 15 percent of the norm for the general population.

The rate of Internet connectivity (of any kind) is 57 percent, or only one point lower than the rate of PC ownership. Apparently, if they are going to have a PC, they are going to connect it. In all groups the rate of Internet connectivity is within a few points of the rate of PC ownership.

However, the same cannot be said of broadband Internet connections. Only 27 percent of households have one (although this still amounts to almost 30 million subscribers) and the adoption rate varies considerably among various groups. Unsurprisingly, affluent, traditional families are the most likely to have a broadband Internet connection. In fact, they are 53 percent more likely than the average American household to have it. They are closely followed by affluent, young singles; affluent empty nesters and older SINKs; DINKs (double income no kids); working parents; and younger, mid-income empty nesters.

The least likely to have a broadband connection are single heads of households who are 75 or older. Their rate of connection is about a third of the average. Married heads of households who are 75 and older follow next, but are nearly half the average, as are single active seniors, plus middle-income older singles. The next tier are the married active seniors, who are connected at about three-fourths the average rate. Most of the other classifications clustered around the average.

Meanwhile, there are still pockets of resistance to the computer revolution, especially among the aged. Single heads of household who are more than 75 years old are twice as likely as average to report no PC usage. That might seem like a niche, but it’s still 2.7 million households. The next group that is least likely to use a PC are the married heads of households who are at least 75-but they are only about a third more likely than average to be non-users. Older, mid- to low-income singles and single active seniors are in that same tier as well. (The least likely to not use a PC are affluent singles, regardless of age.) The scattered resistance is enough to add up to 35 million households without a PC-a significant market, but since they are committed non-users the question is whether they are a viable market.

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