Tag Archives: GooglePlus

Major Sites Visited in Last 30 Days Other Than Facebook

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Filed under Social Networking, TUP 2018

Major Sites Visited in Last 30 Days Other Than Facebook

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Filed under Consumer research, Social Networking, TUP 2018

Google+ … Reversing the Polarity? (TUPdate)

This week, Google announced they’ll be pulling the plug on the consumer-facing Google+, although after unreported widening abandonment. Google’s social network rocket never quite left orbit and was already on its way down. Although the decision was partly portrayed as protecting user’s privacy, recently a substantial number of Google+ users had already abandoned the platform.

In the last year, a substantial number of Google+ users stopped returning. This is based on the results of our independent survey, TUP (Technology User Profile), conducted continuously since 1983. From mid-2014 through mid-2017, Google+ had continued its steady, but stagnant, usage patterns. During that time, the number of active US adult users hovered between 41.7 and 48.6 million. Even before Google announced the closure of Google+, we found in our most recent wave of TUP, fielded mid-year 2018, that the number of Google+ users had dropped nearly in half, to 25.2 million users.

The final Google+ hangers-on form a unique profile, especially for the sites they frequent. They are three times more likely than the average online adult to be active on MySpace, and twice as likely to be using Viber, Reddit, Imgur, or Tumblr.

Demographically, usage levels plummeted simultaneously for all age and gender groups. At one peak point in 2015, 43% of online males age 25 to 34 were using Google+. By 2018, that plummeted to 14%.

Remaining users are not from any particular gender or age group, as all have penetration rates in the teens.

Looking ahead

Even though Google’s announcement hinted they may refocus Google+ on enterprise users, these are also few in number. In fact, a higher-than-average share of remaining Google+ users are unemployed or employed part-time.

Google’s sunsetting may discourage the remaining loyalists, affecting use of other Google products and services. For example, Google+ users are twice as likely as any other online American to be using Google Nexus Player, and Google Chromecast. And, in China and India, Google+ adult users have an above average share of using Google TV and Google Nexus Player. Furthermore, in India, Google+ users actively use an average of 1.64 Google devices, including Smartphones and Tablets.

If the transition is managed well, Google’s attempt to reverse the polarity of a negative to a positive may avoid inadvertently changing Google+ to Google minus.

Source

This post includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile survey, from TUP 2018, its 36th consecutive wave, as well as previous waves. Comparable results are available through TUP fielded in Europe and Asia. For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

 

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Social Networking, TUP 2018, TUPdate

WhatsApp Brazilian Dance Step

Today a Brazilian judge ordered another stop to WhatsApp on Brazil’s smartphones, at least temporarily. (Source: Reuters May 2, 2016)
Creative Commons Courtesy Ed Yourdon
WhatsApp is a very popular communications app around the world, and especially strong in Brazil. According to the most recent wave of our Technology User Profile survey, 82% of Brazil’s connected adults have used WhatsApp in the prior 30 days.

While this means 70.4 million adults are affected, Brazil’s active WhatsApp users have other options. Among the other sites and apps which are actively used for communication and networking, 68% use InstaGram and nearly six in ten (58%) already actively use Skype. Another quarter (26%) use SnapChat and one-in-six (16%) use Viber.
Brazilian WhatsApp users are already in a good position to use other options. Only 1% of WhatsApp users are only using WhatsApp and not using Instagram, Skype, G+, SnapChat, or Viber.
whatsapp metafacts 2016-05-02_16-41-59

Furthermore, while 81% of WhatsApp users use a Smartphone, not all do. WhatsApp is also accessible on PCs. Among the many devices Brazilian WhatsApp adults regularly use, 98% access a PC, and many use more than one. Eight-one percent use 2 or more PCs. Just under half (47%) have a Tablet PC, with Android tablets outnumbering Apple’s iPads or Tablets running Windows.

With WhatsApp’s broad popularity, it’s not as if any particular Smartphone carrier is being singled out. Each carrier’s share among WhatsApp’s customer base is nearly identical to the total base, with TIM having twice the share of any other carrier, Claro (Embratel, NET Serviços) in second place, then followed by Oi SA (Telemar Norte Leste, Brasil Telecom) and Telefônica.

It’s also not as if these Brazilians will have their communication stymied. Ninety percent of WhatsApp users regularly send/receive personal email, 85% text message, 83% make/receive personal phone calls, and 49% participate in a personal web-based group meeting.

Looking ahead
Although legal events like these can cause big disruptions, tech users are resilient, especially Brazilians. Other communication-rich apps and sites such as Skype, G+, SnapChat and Viber will continue to increase their efforts to claim any bewildered or befuddled WhatsApp users. Meanwhile, Brazilian tech users will continue to juggle their many devices as well as the many ways that they already communicate.

Source
This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary from the Technology User Profile survey of adults throughout the US, UK, France, Brazil, and China. The results are based on a multi-country survey of over 10,000 representative respondents conducted by MetaFacts. Current TUP subscribers can obtain additional analysis and supporting datasets at a substantial discount. To license the full market research results, contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Behaviors and Activities, Communication, Desktops, Market Research, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Smartphones, Social Networking, TUP 2015

Social Networking – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive research information about social networking is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Social networking, like other forms of communication and community, is what makes technology usage expand.  People will always be on the lookout for new ways to communicate, whether it be with friends, strangers, or prospective colleagues.  The popularity of social networking sites can make ordinary phones and email less interesting to the modern consumer, increasing demand for smarter smartphones and faster Internet connections.

At the same time, privacy concerns, information overload, and innocent and criminal abuses can dampen the enthusiasm or participation for some market segments.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to social networking. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece; it’s a resource that can answer these and other key questions.

  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How many display screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012