Tag Archives: Feature Phone

Mobile Phones – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about mobile phones is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Both smartphone and basic feature phones today are much more than a phone.  At least, they can be.  With all the capabilities of the modern mobile device, it can be difficult to discern what exactly which consumers are after which capabilities, and what they ultimately use.  Do they use their phone for the texting, for the web, or as a PDA?  As a camera or a gaming tool?  Or do they use it mostly as a traditional telephone?  These questions beg for extensive answers that only careful, detailed market research can provide.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to mobile phones. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides answers to these and many other key questions.

  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary? How does compare to Tablets and other key devices?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones? How about from tablets?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Which segments are using which tech devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • Tracfone for oldsters? Who has the oldest segment by carrier?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • How many display screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How do Verizon’s subscribers compare to AT&T’s?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How strong is name-brand dominance?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Which key tech devices are consumers planning to buy? Which segments show the strongest plans and how does this compare to their tech spending?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Navigation, online maps, location-based mobile phone services, and GPS – who’s getting directions?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Smartphone boa swallowing mobile phone market

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

Reading the popular press, it might seem that Smartphones have consumed the entire mobile phone market. In fact, the Smartphone boa has only swallowed a portion of the American calling public. Also, much of the smartphone market is a replacement market as these busy adopters hanker for newer models or churn to competitive carriers.

Furthermore, some Smartphone callers have even returned to Basic Feature Phones. This brings into question assumptions around how soon Smartphones will dominate.

In Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s classic book “The Little Prince”, he draws a boa constrictor eating an elephant, which many adults mistake for a drawing of a hat. I was reminded of that image while looking at the size of mobile phone transition segments from recent Technology User Profile survey results.

Why is this important?

When you’re deep in the belly of the beast, it’s easy to imagine that the whole world is inside with you.

Realistically, Basic Feature Phone callers outnumber Smartphone users three to two. Smartphone makers and carriers have multiple challenges ahead in trying to convince the rest of the market to adopt Smartphones. Each segment of customers along the mobile phone adoption path has its own unique characteristics and needs.

While many Smartphone shipments are replacing existing Smartphones, with many eager to get the newest iPhone, Android or RIM Smartphone, these replacement markets are very different than conversions into the Smartphone world.

We found that 8% of online adults are in the “Basic Switchers” segment, which means they’re using a Basic Feature Phone after having previously tried a Smartphone. This segment is dominated by both male and female adults age 18-24. This group uses the broadest number of activities, in effect using so much of their Basic Feature phone as to rival many simple-usage Smartphone owners.

Avid mobile phone fans may be surprised that anyone would be in a segment called “Tried & Quit” – online adults who have used a Smartphone or Basic Feature Phone within the last year and not now using one. This is a small, yet measurable segment, dominated by retired or unemployed single adults who treasure simplicity. Evidently, Smartphones outsmarted them and even Basic phones were just not compelling enough.

At the other end of the curve, there’s a very interesting segment labeled “Just Smart”. These are people who have never used a Basic Feature Phone and instead have a Smartphone as their first mobile phone. These callers tend to be parents, active Best Buy shoppers, and employed full-time in larger companies. As might be expected, this group is relatively young, with over half being age 25-44. What might not be expected; this segment has a relatively low share of age 18-24 users.

In the coming year, MetaFacts expects a continued and turbulent replacement environment as carriers and mobile operating systems compete with each other for the most active Smartphone users. The majority of the market is likely to continue its relatively slower migration to Smartphones. Each segment is likely to be further splintered by user’s varied attention on other devices than “traditional” for their calls, music, ebook reading, communication, and images.

Source

The findings in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. In each wave of Technology User Profile, we survey a representative sample of respondents about their use of mobile phones, computers, technology attitudes, and many other consumer electronics products and services, behavioral and socioeconomic factors. Current TUP subscribers can access and drill down more deeply into this phenomenon using TUP Interactive Access or with their datasets.

We began the above analysis by first looking at the answers from over 8,100 respondents in the Technology User Profile service and then drilled down further into their profiles to get a more complete picture.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals can license direct access to TUP.

Contact MetaFacts to access the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing syndicated original research on the market shifts, trends and consumer profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology products and services. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Market Segmentation, TUP 2011, TUPdate

Texas & California may see the largest dominant carrier post-merger-MetaFacts TUPdate

Texas & California may see the largest dominant carrier post-merger

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

With the prospective merger of AT&T and T-Mobile, would the combined dominant share be very different in some states than in others?

Also, will the fog of merger give competitors enough pause to secure their unique clienteles, and attract more of the same?

Nationwide, the combined share of the top three carriers would increase from just over two-thirds (68%) to nearly eight in ten (78%).

Post-merger Carrier Domination

In our most recent wave of Technology User Profile, we found that three carriers – Verizon Wireless, AT&T Mobile, and T-Mobile, collectively hold a 68% share. This is based on the broadest active market – subscribers of mobile carriers using Smartphones or Basic Mobile Phones, with either contract or pre-paid agreements, and among online adults. Combining the subscriber share of AT&T Mobile and T-Mobile, this boosts Sprint into the top group, so that the top three carriers collectively command 78%.

There is a regional difference, in some cases due to the growing popularity of simpler more cost-effective prepaid agreements through MVNOs, and in other cases to the strength of regional operators.

The combined AT&T/T-Mobile share would be 50% or higher in two states: Texas with 55% and California with 50%.

In the Northeast, TracFone is popular enough to be included in the post-merger top 3 carriers, although with a distant 9% to AT&T/T-Mobile & Verizon’s collective 73%. TracFone’s Northeast share is buoyed by New York and Pennsylvania, where the 9% share is similarly far from the two leaders 70% and 73%, respectively.

Among the major states, Wisconsin is unique in the strength of regional carrier US Cellular, which holds a 19% share, even besting nationally-second Verizon. No other regionals have that position or share.

Across other states and regions, Sprint has a third-ranked position. In most key states, Sprint’s share is less than half of the second-ranked carrier.

Whether or not these heightened levels of market dominance constitute a problem will depend primarily on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Department of Justice (DOJ). One of their statistical tests for market concentration is the Herfindal-Hirschman Index (HHI) which summarizes the relative difference of shares. Industries with scores of more than 1,800 are considered concentrated. If post-merger, using our current market share results, Texas would have an HHI of 3,396, California  3,247, and New Jersey 3,208, up from 2,059, 2,154, and 2,547 respectively. Furthermore, the HHI would rise to 3,299 among contract subscribers and 1,716 among prepaid subscribers.

From the customer’s perspective we’ve gathered in findings of our TUP survey results, the usage profiles of AT&T and T-Mobile subscribers are different enough to show this will not be a simple merger. In fact, some customer usage types are unique enough they were already poised to seek better alternatives due to the way they use mobile wireless devices. That’s in addition to changes they might be considering beyond being triggered by the merger announcement, such as their satisfaction levels with customer service, their reception, or the complexity or costs of their subscription agreements.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through a customized report and analysis. Or contact MetaFacts for the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals who want a solid resource they can use immediately after industry events such as mergers, or even use prior to anticipated events, can license direct access to TUP.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010

Will dissatisfied subscribers let their fingers do the walking? – MetaFacts TUPdate

Churn Intention by Major Carrier-MetaFacts

Will dissatisfied subscribers let their fingers do the walking?

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

An old western movie featured a cowboy who sold his horse several times throughout the film. After each sale, the cowboy would wander off and whistle and the horse would run back to the cowboy. The various new owners were upset, yet the cowboy claimed his horse had his own mind.

With the prospective merger of AT&T and T-Mobile, the biggest question is whether the customers will approve of the transaction and stay with the combined unit. Or, will they stray, perhaps back to Verizon or to one of the prepaid MVNOs?

One measure of a subscriber’s mindset is their intention to switch carriers upon the expiration of their contracts.

In our most recent wave of Technology User Profile, we found that both AT&T Wireless and T-Mobile contract subscribers report the highest churn intention rate of any of the major carriers. Close to one in four (23%) of T-Mobile’s online subscribers agree or strongly agree that they plan to switch carriers when their contract expires. Among AT&T subscriber base, this rate is nearly one-fifth at 19%. For comparison, Sprint’s rate is 18% and Verizon’s is 13%. These findings are based on responses from 5,054 online adults who use a mobile phone with a contract agreement, a subset of the entire Technology User Profile survey.

Also, churn intention rates were highest among both carrier’s Smartphone as well as Basic Mobile Phone subscribers.

If the merger were complete today, the combined customer base would have the highest churn intention rate. This is not fully comparable to independent rates, because some subscribers planning to switch likely considered switching from AT&T to T-Mobile or the other way around.

In other findings in our survey results, we’re seeing that the segments of customers AT&T has attracted are different enough from T-Mobile’s subscribers that it’s likely that both companies will need to create an assortment of campaigns to address the wide span of segments. Furthermore, this will rattle the positions of handset manfacturers from Motorola to Apple and RIM.

Of course, wireless carriers do all they can to sway subscriber’s churn intentions, and we’re likely to see creative efforts from both companies to entice subscribers to stay, just as competitors Verizon, Sprint, and others will do their best to welcome them into their fold.

So, we’ll all be keeping our ears open for the whistle which might draw subscribers back to Verizon, although some might instead follow the growing herd to prepaid alternatives.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through a customized report and analysis. Or contact MetaFacts for the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other Internet-oriented questions TUP covers on www.technologyuser.com.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010, TUPdate

Is the Internet still fun, or is the novelty gone? – reported in MetaFacts TUP survey

Internet Fun by Age Group

Is the Internet still fun, or is the novelty gone? – reported in MetaFacts TUP survey

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, MetaFacts Principal Analyst

Fun is one of the strongest gravitational forces drawing people to use the Internet. There are of course many other factors influencing usage and adoption levels, such as productivity and connection with friends, yet fun and enjoyment are key human needs.

As part of Technology User Profile, we asked respondents whether they are finding more ways to use the Internet for fun. Nearly two-thirds (64%) agreed or strongly agreed. This is from a carefully balanced sample of 8,175 adults in the second phase of the Technology User Profile survey.

Even at surface level, this finding is a positive sign for the continued growth and strength of the Internet and the many technology products and services relying on it. As adults continue to explore new ways to use the Internet it is a positive sign, and it’s even better to see that the majority of adults do so.

Not all adults agree, however, and some groups show more enthusiasm than others. Younger adults (age 18-34) more strongly agree that they are finding more fun online, with nearly 7 in 10 (69%) agreeing or strongly agreeing. Fewer older adults (age 35 and up) are as enthusiastic, with just under half (49%) agreeing or strongly agreeing.

We also looked more closely to compare Smartphone subscribers to users of Basic Mobile Phones. We wanted to see whether Smartphone users are so charmed with their newer technology that they aren’t enjoying their Internet experience as much for fun. Smartphone subscribers actually have a higher enthusiasm for the web than users of Basic Mobile Phones. Over two-thirds (70%) of Smartphone users agree or strongly agreed with the statement “I keep finding more ways to use the Internet for fun.” This is stronger than the 54% of Basic Mobile Phone users who similarly agree.

This is due only in part to the generally younger age of Smartphone subscribers, because other factors also define the difference: marital status, presence of children (particularly teens), and gender.

Looking more deeply, we examined whether technology experience made a difference. Correcting for age, long-time PC users had the same attitude as those newer to using a PC. There was no significant difference between the attitudes of younger adults (age 18-34) who are Younger PC Newbies – who have used a PC for less than a quarter of their lifetime and Younger PC Veterans, those who have more experience. Also, within older adults (age 35+) the attitudes are the same for Older PC Newbies and Older PC Veterans.

In related analysis, lack of interest is a key deterrent to many that are not using social networking sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, or MySpace.

Analysis

The technology industry thrives on change and exploration, and while there have been cycles of irrational exuberance and retrenchment, true and sustainable growth or contraction is based on the attitudes and behaviors of technology consumers.

Fun and home entertainment is one key component of the most enthusiastic tech consumers, and for these fans, the Internet is a strong part of their home entertainment experience. With Smartphones and Tablets vying for tech consumers’ attention, PCs stand to be threatened as user’s core Internet portal. Furthermore, different groups of tech consumers react differently to key damping issues such as over-advertising, spam, and privacy concerns.

Fortunately for the tech industry, the quest for fun continues to be a major and positive part of the leading indicators defining technology adoption.

Source

MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition – report available by contacting MetaFacts. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other Internet-oriented questions TUP covers on www.technologyuser.com.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts or call at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, Statistics, Technology User Overview Report, Trends, TUP 2010, TUPdate