Tag Archives: Eyeballs

Tech Media, Advertising, TV – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about tech media, advertising and TV is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Today’s media-savvy consumers may want their MTV, but they might seek alternative methods to get it.  Advertising seems to have become an option for the consumer, who today is able to bypass commercials, salespeople, and even email in favor of social networking and other sites.  Advertisers in this day and age have to be both flexible and targeted while ubiquitous in order to get their message across.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to tech media, advertising, and television. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers solid answers to the following questions, and more.

  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within market segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Tech Media, Advertising, TV – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about tech media, advertising and TV is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Today’s media-savvy consumers may want their MTV, but they might seek alternative methods to get it.  Advertising seems to have become an option for the consumer, who today is able to bypass commercials, salespeople, and even email in favor of social networking and other sites.  Advertisers in this day and age have to be both flexible and targeted while ubiquitous in order to get their message across.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to tech media, advertising, and television. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers solid answers to the following questions, and more.

  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What do users sync or store in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within brand segment?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • Is email dying being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • Beyond paper or plastic: which types of ink & toner are printer users buying? New or refilled? Original or competitor?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • Where are printer users buying their printer supplies? Are these the same channels as where they buy their printers?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
    Used/Refurbished PCs – who buys them?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do get one again, if you do?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How important is privacy when getting rid of old computers?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • To what extent have Dell and Lexmark penetrated the printer market? Which segments have they penetrated?
  • What is Hewlett Packard’s share among Dell computer owners and Dell or Lexmark printer owners and has this changed?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

TUPdate: Mouse Potato or Couch Potato? Interactive Fun Draws TV Viewers Ever Towards PCs

At the same time Americans are buying ever-bigger TVs, they are turning their attention to smaller screens – those on their PCs. In the 2008 Annual Edition of Technology User Profile, we found that 57% of Home PC Households agree with this statement: “I spend more time using my computer than watching TV.” Only one year ago, this percentage was less than half – 45%. What is the significance of this increasingly defined divide?

The draw to the PC away from TV stems from – where else? – Entertainment. Nearly four times as many PC-focused Americans as TV-focused ones say “I keep finding more ways to use the internet for fun,” with 76% of PCers and 20% of TVers in agreement. Also, 89% of PCers surveyed agree: “The Internet is a big part of my home entertainment,” compared with 36% of TVers.

Also, hands-on interactivity is a major draw, as the PC-focused go beyond simply pushing a few buttons on their remote controls. PC-focused Americans engage in uniquely proactive, leading-edge, and niche activities more often than TV-focused Americans do. Substantially more PCers participate in interactive chatting (47% PCers, 19% TVers), social networking (35% PCers, 12% TVers), and web publishing (15% PCers, 3% TVers) than do their TV-focused counterparts.

Furthermore, PCers use their PCs and the Internet for a wider range of activities, averaging 18 different activities compared with 11 on average among TVers. This reflects a self-reinforcing effect, as people discover more things they can do with their personal computers, the more they weave them into their daily lives, and then they are able to discover yet more activities of interest.

Although there are myths that the web is primarily frequented by young millennials, there are no strong demographic differences between those who identify as PC-focused and those who consider themselves TV-focused. These interactivity-seeking PC users are young and old, male and female, and high-income as well as low-income.

Looking ahead, we don’t agree with straight-lining pundits who forecast mass migration of eyeballs to the ever-tinier screens of mobile phones and PDAs. Instead, as we’ve watched technology adoption these last 2 decades, we stick with a whole-person view. There are brains and fingers attached to those eyeballs.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Statistics, Technology, TUP 2007, TUP 2008, TUPdate

PC Hours Continue to Climb

News flash: even more recent updates to this information are available to subscribers to the full Technology User Profile service.

Where do you spend your waking hours?

For most Americans, looking at a computer screen is the growing answer.

More of Americans’ time is with their computers – both at home and in the workplace. On average, Americans spent 25.9 hours a week using their PCs in 2005, up from 24.5 hours a week two years earlier. Both home and workplace PC usage levels have continued to grow in the last two years.

Why is this important?

As Americans integrate computers even further into their lives, the implications are wide-ranging, from their ergonomics and health, to privacy and national security, and even social interaction and consumerism. Besides the PC, software, and Internet companies, it also impacts media such as TV and radio that chase the attention of Americans’ eyeballs.

The total number of hours Americans use computers has climbed to 6.5 billion hours per week in 2005, up from 4.8 billion hours in 2004 and 4.3 billion hours in 2003. This is significant, representing 1 out of 7 total hours in a week, up from 1 of 12 only two years prior. To put this further into perspective, this is 20% of all waking hours, up from 13% only two years prior.

In the workplace, some occupational groups use computers much more than others. It’s hardly a surprise that Computer-Related occupations lead all Americans in their use of work computers, with an average of 37.6 hours per week. Since this is nearly all of a standard 40-hour workweek, we have to wonder if they’re having their lunches at their desks. More likely they’re working more hours than average.

Employees in Accounting & Finance jobs also use computers more than most, at 35.2 hours per week on average. In their case, it’s about spreadsheets – lots of spreadsheets. 79% of these employees cite spreadsheets as a regular computer activity, compared with 36% of other PC users.

At the other end of the spectrum, some occupational groups use computers less often, at nearly half the rate of the busiest. Of the Construction/Labor employees that use a work computer, the average is 21 hours per week. This is only slightly higher than the lowest group, Education/Training, who stand at 20.6 hours per week. Evidently, instructors spend more time in front of the classroom instead of their computer.

There are numerous factors that explain why Americans continue to increase their PC usage. Like the adaptable Swiss Army knife, the PC can be used for a wide range of activities reasonably well. Meanwhile, function-specific products, although technically superior at their core tasks, fail to convince convenience-hungry Americans. For example, cell phones have higher penetration than PCs, although are still primarily used for communication, despite efforts to entice callers to expand their handset experience to play games, take pictures, and organize their lives. They even have to compete with the PC as a communication device. Only a small number of Americans, 14%, agree with the statement “I Would Rather Use a Telephone Than Email.”

Even though TV media continue to vie for American’s eyeballs, a large number of Americans aren’t fully convinced. Nearly a third, 31%, agree with the statement “I Spend More Time Using my Computer Than Watching TV” and 28% agree that “The Internet is a Big Part of My Home Entertainment.”

Although the primacy of the PC isn’t assured forever, Americans continue to find ways for their PCs to be a big and growing part of their lives. This is a good sign for the health of the computer industry.

Average Hours Using a PC Continues to Climb

Total Hours Americans Use PCs

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Statistics, Tech Market, Technology, Trends, TUP 2005