Tag Archives: Basic mobile phones

Multi-Platform Usage Shifts-Solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive solid information about multi-platform usage shifts–who accesses what technology, and where and how they do it–is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

As consumers’ options for communication, entertainment, and organization grow, one thing seems to stay the same:  change. The more choices that choosy consumers have, the more choices they want, and if they can get it all in one package–even better. But that may not mean that smartphones are replacing PCs–when you can have all the options in one place, certain consumers prefer a few devices to choose between.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to the multi-platform reality. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides dynamic data to answer the following key questions, as well as many others.

  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How many device screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture? Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Which segments are utilizing cloud storage or sharing services? For which activities? What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Do Apple users “grow up and give up” their Apple? When do they get one again, if they do?
  • How much is assisted navigation part of life – and on which platform? Which user segments use which devices or services?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Which key tech devices are consumers planning to buy? Which segments show the strongest plans and how does this compare to their tech spending?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Which segments are using which tech devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Netbooks – what are true adoption rates, and into which market segments?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple-PC Household, Statistics, Tech Market, Technology, Trends, TUP 2010, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Smartphone boa swallowing mobile phone market

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

Reading the popular press, it might seem that Smartphones have consumed the entire mobile phone market. In fact, the Smartphone boa has only swallowed a portion of the American calling public. Also, much of the smartphone market is a replacement market as these busy adopters hanker for newer models or churn to competitive carriers.

Furthermore, some Smartphone callers have even returned to Basic Feature Phones. This brings into question assumptions around how soon Smartphones will dominate.

In Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s classic book “The Little Prince”, he draws a boa constrictor eating an elephant, which many adults mistake for a drawing of a hat. I was reminded of that image while looking at the size of mobile phone transition segments from recent Technology User Profile survey results.

Why is this important?

When you’re deep in the belly of the beast, it’s easy to imagine that the whole world is inside with you.

Realistically, Basic Feature Phone callers outnumber Smartphone users three to two. Smartphone makers and carriers have multiple challenges ahead in trying to convince the rest of the market to adopt Smartphones. Each segment of customers along the mobile phone adoption path has its own unique characteristics and needs.

While many Smartphone shipments are replacing existing Smartphones, with many eager to get the newest iPhone, Android or RIM Smartphone, these replacement markets are very different than conversions into the Smartphone world.

We found that 8% of online adults are in the “Basic Switchers” segment, which means they’re using a Basic Feature Phone after having previously tried a Smartphone. This segment is dominated by both male and female adults age 18-24. This group uses the broadest number of activities, in effect using so much of their Basic Feature phone as to rival many simple-usage Smartphone owners.

Avid mobile phone fans may be surprised that anyone would be in a segment called “Tried & Quit” – online adults who have used a Smartphone or Basic Feature Phone within the last year and not now using one. This is a small, yet measurable segment, dominated by retired or unemployed single adults who treasure simplicity. Evidently, Smartphones outsmarted them and even Basic phones were just not compelling enough.

At the other end of the curve, there’s a very interesting segment labeled “Just Smart”. These are people who have never used a Basic Feature Phone and instead have a Smartphone as their first mobile phone. These callers tend to be parents, active Best Buy shoppers, and employed full-time in larger companies. As might be expected, this group is relatively young, with over half being age 25-44. What might not be expected; this segment has a relatively low share of age 18-24 users.

In the coming year, MetaFacts expects a continued and turbulent replacement environment as carriers and mobile operating systems compete with each other for the most active Smartphone users. The majority of the market is likely to continue its relatively slower migration to Smartphones. Each segment is likely to be further splintered by user’s varied attention on other devices than “traditional” for their calls, music, ebook reading, communication, and images.

Source

The findings in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. In each wave of Technology User Profile, we survey a representative sample of respondents about their use of mobile phones, computers, technology attitudes, and many other consumer electronics products and services, behavioral and socioeconomic factors. Current TUP subscribers can access and drill down more deeply into this phenomenon using TUP Interactive Access or with their datasets.

We began the above analysis by first looking at the answers from over 8,100 respondents in the Technology User Profile service and then drilled down further into their profiles to get a more complete picture.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals can license direct access to TUP.

Contact MetaFacts to access the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing syndicated original research on the market shifts, trends and consumer profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology products and services. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Market Segmentation, TUP 2011, TUPdate

Multi-Platform Usage Shifts-Solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

  • Are Smartphones replacingcou PCs? Have they already? Which market segments have and which haven’t?
  • Have netbooks, tablets, and eReaders replaced desktops?
  • Have GPS/PND devices been replaced by direction-finding smartphone apps?

Extensive solid information about multi-platform usage shifts–who accesses what technology, and where and how they do it–is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

As consumers’ options for communication, entertainment, and organization grow, one thing seems to stay the same:  change. The more choices that choosy consumers have, the more choices they want, and if they can get it all in one package–even better. But that may not mean that smartphones are replacing PCs–when you can have all the options in one place, certain consumers prefer a few devices to choose between.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to the multi-platform reality. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides dynamic data to answer the following key questions, as well as many others.

  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • What do users sync or store in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do get one again, if you do?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows, and Blackberry users?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many?
  • Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using and planning to use?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Is email being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Which operating systems dominate within which segments?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • How are users incorporating digital images, through the use of digital cameras, scanners, downloading images, as well as how are they producing output?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • Which segments are utilizing the cloud? For which activities?
  • Navigation, online maps, location-based mobile phone services, and GPS – who’s getting directions?
  • Are mobile computers used longer or shorter than desktops? If so, what’s the difference, and who uses them longest?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • How much is assisted navigation part of life – and on which platform?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • What happens to old PCs? Are they dumped? Recycled? Sold? Which segments dispose in which way?
  • What are the major activities that people do with their printers?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple-PC Household, Statistics, Tech Market, Technology, Trends, TUP 2010, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Smartphones challenge Mobile PCs – the users speak

A TUPdate from MetaFacts by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

You can’t go out for coffee these days without sharing space with legions of dedicated smartphone users doing everything from texting their friends to checking the latest NFL or soccer scores. With smartphone functionality and the number of available apps increasing at hyper speed, could this trend foreshadow the decline of the mobile computer and relegate all those laptops, netbooks and tablets to the land of the Atari? Will Apple iPhones, RIM Blackberries, Winphones or the Android-powered grab the fingers of the most-mobile among us?  Our new MetaFacts Technology User Profile, 2009 Global Insights Edition polled over 22,000+ online PC adults in 10 developed countries and found some surprising answers.

Why is this important?

Makers of mobile computers, smartphone manufacturers, wireless carriers and application developers should all be watching these trends closely both from an R&D standpoint and a marketing perspective. OEMs of desktop computers should also take heed if more and more users opt for portables even if they don’t use them in more than one location.

First let’s look at who’s using mobile PCs these days and where they are using them. Not surprisingly, this is a younger group overall. The average age of online adult mobile PC users is nearly seven years younger than the average desktop user. Nearly a third of the mobile computer users are in the college age to early career category of 18-34 year olds.

Just where are mobile PCs being used? The age of the user is also a factor here. The younger users are, the more likely they were to report using their mobile computers in four or more locations, a finding that is likely reflective of the more mobile lifestyle of this segment.

But desktop and mobile PC manufacturers take notice: Nearly half of mobile PCs are used in only one location. This begs the question of why these homebody mobiles are stuck in their desk job. If this trend continues, will the pendulum swing away from netbooks and ever-lighter notebook PCs back to full-featured desktop replacements?

And the mobile PCs seem to be working harder than desktops. The portables are logging more hours than their desktop cousins with nearly 25% being used for 40 or more hours per week versus 18% of desktops being used that much.

So what are these mobile computer users doing with their portables? While their activities are generally the same as those performed on their desktops, the survey showed that mobile PCs which are used in multiple locations appeared to be much more integrated into the user’s life. These younger multiple-location PC users reported performing nearly double the number of activities on their mobile PCs than the group reporting that their mobile PCs remained tethered to one location.

The more years people use computers, the more activities they add to their list of things to do with their machines. PC Veterans, people who have used computers over a quarter of their lives, use their mobile PCs for more activities than PC Newbies, regardless of their age. Not surprisingly, users in the 18-24 age category use their mobile PCs more often for entertainment and communication than older mobile computer users.

Now let’s turn to the role that cell phones play in the mobile PC world. With the ever-increasing functionality of phones, is the choice of mobile connectivity an either/or when it comes using mobile computers and smartphones? Our survey showed quite the opposite. Even the savviest of smartphone users are not likely to give up their mobile computers. Interestingly, the adults who reported using the most functionality on their phones also reported using their mobile PCs in more locations, nearly twice the number of those who used their mobile phones only as basic phones. Bottom line: When it comes to the question of whether to take the smartphone or the mobile PC to the cybercafé, the current answer is often “both.”

If today’s mobile PCs could talk, they might paraphrase Mark Twain’s famous quote, “The reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.”

Further Resources

MetaFacts Technology User Profile – 2009 Global Insights Edition – a syndicated survey of 30,889 representative respondents in 16 countries

MetaFacts Technology User Profile – 2009 Global Insights Edition – Developed Economies – a syndicated survey of 22,072 representative respondents in 10 countries

MetaFacts Mobile PC Brand Profile Report – analysis of the mobile market based on results in MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2008 Annual Edition – a syndicated survey of over 10,000 representative respondents in the U.S.

About this TUPdate

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Windows Vista, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry topics. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a national market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are widely recognized as a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. For more information about the syndicated research service, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, TUP 2009, TUPdate

Printing Mobile Phone Photos: The New Frontier

A TUPdate from MetaFacts by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

When you take a photo with your mobile phone’s digital camera, you can share it by waving the tiny screen at other people, or incur the expense of sending it over the network. Or you can do the sensible thing and print it out—but, worldwide, only one person in eight actually does that.Or so it seems from a recent MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2009 Global Insights Edition survey of 30,889 online PC-using adults in 16 countries. While nearly two-thirds of the respondents (64 percent) did take pictures with their mobile phones, only 12 percent ever printed out pictures from their mobile phones.

The rate, however, varied from country to country, with people in emerging nations proving to be far more likely to immortalize their phone snapshots on paper. The rate peaked at 24 percent among India’s Upper Urbanites, followed by 23 percent of China’s Urbanites, 20 percent in Mexico, and 17 percent in Russia. The rate bottomed at 6 percent in South Korea and 7 percent in Japan, rising to 8 percent in Holland and the U.S.

Yet, 64 percent of the global respondents did use their mobile phones to take pictures, implying that there are a lot of unprinted pictures out there.

Leading the charge of the cell phone paparazzi were the Saudi Arabians, 86 percent of whom used their phones for taking photos. They were followed at a distance by 77 percent of Mexican respondents, and 76 percent of South Korean and Indian respondents. Those avoiding mobile phone photography were led by the Dutch (55 percent), the Americans (56 percent) and the Germans (57 percent.)

Interestingly, the rate of mobile phone picture printing was roughly an inverse to the national rate of digital camera ownership—although, at 78 percent, most respondents did use a digital camera. For instance, India, which ranked #1 in the rate of mobile phone picture printing, ranked next to last (#15) in terms of digital camera use. China ranked #2 in cell phone picture printing, but #12 in digital camera use. Mexico ranked #3 in cell phone picture printing and #14 in terms of digital camera use.

But it did not work in the other direction—South Korea was dead last (#16) in cell phone picture printing, but a middling #10 in digital camera use.

While we’re talking about digital photography hardcopy, 20 percent of global respondents said they had used kiosks to print their pictures, with those in Mexico leading the way at 31 percent. Retail printing centers were used by a similar 19 percent, and they were most popular in Brazil, where 36 percent used them.

Overall, pictures were more likely to be taken by mobile phones than by digital cameras in India, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia, and the rate was neck-and-neck in Russia. Elsewhere, digital cameras still ruled the pixels.

As for film cameras, globally only 27 percent of the respondents still used them, the leaders being the Indians at 42 percent. At the other extreme, only 18 percent still admitted having them in Japan.

Mobile phone and smartphone photo printing may move from a niche into an everyday activity. Hewlett Packard, who dominates the world in PC printing, has recently released a way to make it easier to print mobile phone images. Their HP iPrint Photo app which makes it easy to quickly print a 4”x6” or 10cm x 15cm image on almost any HP printer through a wireless connection, For now, the app only works on Apple iPhones or iPod touch.

News flash: even more recent updates to this information are available to subscribers to the full Technology User Profile service, the TUP Overview Report, and other TUP Profile Reports.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through a customized report and analysis. Also, access The MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition Report by contacting MetaFacts, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals who want a solid resource they can use immediately after industry events such as mergers, or even use prior to anticipated events, can license direct access to TUP.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at http://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Mobile Phones, TUP 2009, TUPdate