Tag Archives: Age

Connected device combos for Males 18-44 – de rigueur to commandos (MetaFAQs)

Which combination of connected devices is most used by Males 18-44?

Aren’t young males considered enough of a bellwether group to lead the rest of the market?

If so, might there be many who have chosen to forgo using a Desktop or Notebook PC, and rely only on their Smartphone or Tablet and Smartphone?

Our research shows that young males, age 18-44, continue to include a PC in effectively every combination of connected devices they actively use. Also, as a group they have clear preferences about which device combination they choose. Well over half, 59%, actively use one of two major combinations of devices. metafacts-metafaqs-mq0556-2016-11-01_14-52-53

The device combination standing head and shoulders above all others includes many types of devices. In use by 44% of males age 18-44, the combo de rigueur includes a Tablet, both a Notebook and Desktop PC, and a mobile phone.

The second-used combination, used by just one one-sixth (15%), includes a Smartphone and either a Desktop or Notebook PC. This combination does not include a Tablet.

The third-used combination is similar with the second-used combination. Account ingfor 12% of adults in this group, it includes a Tablet, mobile, and PC. The PC is not a Notebook, but instead is a Desktop PC.

The PC is very much alive among males age 18-44, being present in every device combination except one. That combination includes only a Tablet and mobile phone only includes a few commandos, and number only 3% of males 18-44.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active younger males.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapter with the most information about device usage and combinations is the TUP 2016 Devices Chapter.

This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapters with the most information about activities is the TUP 2016 Printers Chapter.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Who spends most on tech – older or younger adults? (MetaFAQs)

In many tech circles, there’s a strong attention on the youngest adults. How true is it that younger adults spend more than older adults?

Our research shows that when it comes to household tech spending, age matters, although it’s not that simple.

First of all, while the youngest adults often are the most enthusiastic about technology, they don’t have the same financial means of older adults.

The majority of household tech spending is among adults age 30-39.metafacts-mqxxxx-tech-spending-x-age-2016-11-01_07-51-20

More importantly, when adjusting for employment status – including the self-employed – the analysis is clearer. Employed adults out-spend those not employed from ages 25 to 54.

There’s a “late life kicker” that’s important to note. After age 60, household tech spending is stronger among those not employed than those employed. Also, although employment rates decline with age, total household tech spending is stronger among the age 65-69 group than the age 55-59.

This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users. Specifically for this analysis, we looked at household tech spending along 15 categories of technology devices and services, from PCs, printers, and routers to Internet and mobile phone service.

Many other related answers are part of the full TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP chapters with the most information about activities is the TUP 2016 User Profile Chapter, which includes sections more deeply analyzing by age and life stage.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP).

For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Demographics & Econographics, Households, Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2016

Technology Consumer Demographics – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about technology consumer demographics is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

It’s not enough to know that someone may buy your product or service – it’s vital to know who and how many. True technology marketers and researchers know well how important it is to understand their current and future customers.

Often, the fabled early adopters have had a different demographic makeup than expected, causing serious mistakes and disconnects. The changes are far from over.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to technology consumer demographics. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary? How does compare to Tablets and other key devices?
  • How does PC and online usage vary across segments such as workplace company size or industry?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Do Apple users “grow up and give up” their Apple? When do they get one again, if they do?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • How central is game-playing to the general population? How about within certain key market segments?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • How tech-experienced are game-players?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • How do market segments vary in demand opportunities for tech products and services?
  • To what extent do tech shoppers focus on certain channels for certain products versus staying with a smaller number of outlets?
  • Which market segments are dating online?
  • What else do they frequently do online? Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • How do consumer attitudes about purchasing technology differ between Apple, Hewlett Packard and Dell customers?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within market segment?
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • How is HP’s PC penetration within the overall HP footprint?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Beyond paper or plastic: which types of ink & toner are printer users buying? New or refilled? Original or competitor?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of tech product adoption?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Tracfone for oldsters? Who has the oldest segment by carrier?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Households, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Social Networking – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive research information about social networking is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Social networking, like other forms of communication and community, is what makes technology usage expand.  People will always be on the lookout for new ways to communicate, whether it be with friends, strangers, or prospective colleagues.  The popularity of social networking sites can make ordinary phones and email less interesting to the modern consumer, increasing demand for smarter smartphones and faster Internet connections.

At the same time, privacy concerns, information overload, and innocent and criminal abuses can dampen the enthusiasm or participation for some market segments.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to social networking. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece; it’s a resource that can answer these and other key questions.

  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How many display screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Calling the Shots While Driving the Wagon: Renegades say they should be allowed to text or email while driving

Busiest Road Warriors want to Text or Email While Driving – MetaFacts

October 2012 update – TUP 2012 results showing distracted drivers holding steady at nine percent.Calling the Shots While Driving the Wagon: Renegades say they should be allowed to text or email while driving

A MetaFacts TUPDate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

When you change lanes on the highway, you hope that the guy next to you isn’t a distracted driver looking at his smartphone instead of at the road. Ninety percent of the time, you’d be fine. On the other hand, a recent MetaFacts Technology User Profile survey showed 9% of online Americans agree or strongly agree with this statement: “I should be allowed to text or email while I am driving a car.” Nine percent isn’t 100%, but considering the concentration of people on the road in any ordinary rush hour, that 9% adds up to a lot of road risk.

Who are these renegades? It seems they have a few commonalities, ranging from age, state, and parental status to privacy attitudes. Eighteen percent of 18 to 24-year olds surveyed felt that they should be allowed to text and email while driving, and the concentration of renegades indeed appears to be in the young-uns: that 18% is double the national average. The 25 to 34-year-old group come in second, with 16% wanting to multitask in their vehicles, followed only slightly more slowly by the 35-44 age bracket with 10%. After that, percentages drop down to 5% and lower in older age groups—it seems that most of these rebels get hit with a dose of safety-juice by the time they hit their mid-forties.

Yet, there is something these folks have in common which points to a concern for safety, even coupled with their desire to type and drive, and that is their tendency toward device-security consciousness. 71% of renegades agree: “For security, I do things such as password-protecting my phone or limiting what is stored on it,” compared to the national average of 30%. Is the line between physical safety and the safety of our information becoming blurred, or is this issue just holding the door for better voice-recognition technology?

Are these renegades simply using mobiles for texting or emailing more than average? MetaFacts survey shows the links between age and texting in general, where 18 to 24-year olds top the charts as well. That age group’s attitude about texting while driving reflects this inclination. Mobile emailers, on the other hand, are led in a close race by the 25 to 34-year-old demographic (42% of 25-34-year-olds use their mobile devices for email vs. 37% of 18-24-year-olds and 32% of 35-44-year-olds).

While age seems one of the main things renegades have in common, gender does not appear to be a significant factor in who texts and drives; only slightly fewer women than men surveyed wanted to use their keypad en route (7% and 11%, respectively). But be they men or women, what might tie these people together is a hunger for better, more streamlined technology.

Judging from the types of phones renegades use, it seems their thirst for new technology may be comparable to their need for untimely texting and emailing. 21% of Android users are renegades, followed close behind by 20% of Apple iPhone users and 16% of Blackberry users. This tech-heavy crowd might just be waiting for the right technology to help them send an email in the car, without having to type it out the old-fashioned way.

Clearly, this scary finding implies a need for a shift in the world of smartphones, and mobile companies should take note. While safety-inducing apps exist to render texting and emailing applications defunct while operating a vehicle, they tend to be geared toward the protective parenting set, which make them seem unlikely that they would appeal to the renegade mindset. In that case, better voice-recognition technology ought to be on the forefront of this issue. Some of this technology is already in place, and the renegade wordsmiths on the roads today seem likely to keep up their bad behavior, favoring accessibility and convenience over safety.

This seems as much an issue for marketing as R&D. The demand for voice-activated texting and email for this niche of rebels, with their busy lifestyles and need for constant quick communication, may lie more in the convenience and speed of the new technology rather than its image as a safety feature.

MetaFacts expects the first early adopters for this technology to include several unique and dissimilar segments: ultra-mobile road warriors, tech-savvy soccer moms, hyperactive smartphone users, Twitter addicts, certain ethnic groups, particularly in states enforcing distracted-driver laws. With that as the case, these texting renegades may be leading voice-activated texting and email out of the periphery so that it can, so to speak, take the wheel.

Source

The results in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. Results specific to this topic can be obtained through a customized report and analysis. Or contact MetaFacts for the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically. This edition is for the U.S. based on the 2010 wave of Technology User Profile gathered among a scrupulously selected set of representative respondents, surveyed both online and offline.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other Internet-oriented questions TUP covers on www.technologyuser.com.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing research on the market shifts and profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Moms and Dads, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology industry trends and facts. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Technology User Overview Report, TUP 2010, TUP 2012, TUPdate