Category Archives: TUP 2009

Technology User Profile – 2009 Annual Edition

Early Adopters Don’t Always Act Their Age in the U.S. or Elsewhere

A MetaFacts TUPdate by Dan Ness, Principal Analyst

Are Americans really a nation of early adopters? Are early adopters mostly age 18-24 in the U.S. and other countries? While Americans pride themselves on many forward-thinking attributes, it is not ranked first for early PC adopters compared with many developed and developing countries.

Think back to how old you were the first time you used a personal computer. If you are American and were 17 or younger, then you’re in the youngest 21% of American early adopters and ranked 10th among 16 major countries. As an under-18 adopter in Brazil, you’re less unique, being in the same group as 31% of today’s Brazilian online adults, and ranked 1st for youthful PC adoption. If you were 26 and Italian, Australian, or Saudi Arabian, then you were younger than average in your country.

There are many reasons that some countries have a higher share of young first-time PC users than other countries. One element is how evenly income is distributed, as shown by measures such as the Gini coefficient. Countries such as Brazil and Mexico have a similar distribution of income today as they had when PCs were becoming widely available there in the 1980’s, so today’s wealthier adults were most often in wealthy families which had better access to technology. There are also cultural differences, some of which encourage younger people to use technology for their education or economic future. Other cultures may discourage youngsters from using technology, such as for their safety and privacy. Saudi Arabia is affected by this cultural preference, even though its wealthiest citizens are still the strongest adopters.

South Korea is at the latest end of the age-adoption spectrum. On first glance, this may seem counterintuitive to Korea-watchers, since South Korea has enacted and maintained national policy to narrow its digital divide and to get its population online and connected to the Internet. In fact, in doing so, South Korea leapfrogged many other countries in the speed and breadth of its citizens’ connectivity. However, since this was enacted relatively recently, it accelerated the adoption rate among adults in the workplace, and to some degree less among younger children in homes.

Why is this important?

Assuming that early adopters are all young Millennial Gen Y or Gen Z oversimplifies the market and misses the mark. Experience matters, since tech-savvy users make different decisions than relative newbies, particularly when correcting for age.

The age of first PC use as well as the years of usage tell a lot about the person’s experience, with the past pointing the way toward their likeliest future choices. After all, someone who has gone through 10 versions of Microsoft Windows (including Millennium Edition) will have a different perspective than a similarly-aged first-time PC user.

In conducting factor analysis with the Technology User Profile datasets, MetaFacts finds that both earliest age of adoption and length of experience are strong additional factors to explain the variance when predicting the heaviest and lightest consumers of new information technology and consumer electronics products and services. These factors are in addition to other other more standard demographics. In other words, likelihood to adopt new technology is not only about youth; early adopters are more likely to act like early adopters even as they age.

This has implications for any tech marketers seeking a more effective path than the simplified approach of focusing marketing primarily to certain younger age groups. The first implication is to lower the risk of wasting resources with misdirected energy. Another implication is that new & stronger markets may emerge beyond the stereotypical young adopter as early adopter, leading to even more effective results.

Source

The findings in this TUPdate are drawn from the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Survey. In each wave of Technology User Profile, we survey a representative sample of respondents about their use of mobile phones, computers, technology attitudes, and many other consumer electronics products and services, behavioral and socioeconomic factors. Current TUP subscribers can access and drill down more deeply into this phenomenon using TUP Interactive Access or with their datasets.

We began the above analysis by first looking at the answers from over 30,889 respondents in the Technology User Profile service and then drilled down further into their profiles to get a more complete picture.

To see other research coverage of Internet products and activities  – from smartphones to feature phones, desktops to notebooks, social networking, demographics, and attitudes – see the many other questions TUP answers on www.technologyuser.com. Tech market research professionals can license direct access to TUP.

Contact MetaFacts to access the MetaFacts Technology User Profile Overview Edition report, which covers the broader range of key trends. View findings in 25 pages of executive summary analysis, 200+ pages of charts and graphs, all supported by 95+ pages of detailed tables. The complete, 300+ page report is delivered to you electronically.

About TUPdates

MetaFacts releases ongoing syndicated original research on the market shifts, trends and consumer profiles for Smartphones, Netbooks, Mobile PCs, Workplace PCs, Home PCs, Web Creators, Broadband, and many other technology products and services. These TUPdates are short analytical articles in a series of specific topics utilizing the Technology User Profile Annual Edition study, which reveals the changing patterns of technology adoption around the world. Interested technology professionals can sign up at https://technologyuser.com/contact/ for complimentary TUPdates – periodic snapshots of technology markets.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUPdate

Tech Media, Advertising, TV – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about tech media, advertising and TV is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Today’s media-savvy consumers may want their MTV, but they might seek alternative methods to get it.  Advertising seems to have become an option for the consumer, who today is able to bypass commercials, salespeople, and even email in favor of social networking and other sites.  Advertisers in this day and age have to be both flexible and targeted while ubiquitous in order to get their message across.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to tech media, advertising, and television. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers solid answers to the following questions, and more.

  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What do users sync or store in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within brand segment?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • Is email dying being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • Beyond paper or plastic: which types of ink & toner are printer users buying? New or refilled? Original or competitor?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • Where are printer users buying their printer supplies? Are these the same channels as where they buy their printers?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
    Used/Refurbished PCs – who buys them?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do get one again, if you do?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How important is privacy when getting rid of old computers?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • To what extent have Dell and Lexmark penetrated the printer market? Which segments have they penetrated?
  • What is Hewlett Packard’s share among Dell computer owners and Dell or Lexmark printer owners and has this changed?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

The Mobile Personal Computer market – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about the mobile personal computer market is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

The market for changing technologies is always in flux, and mobile PCs are not exception to the rule. It’s important to know your market, and know it well–is the coffee-shop CEO the leader of the mobile PC pack, or is it the high-school gamer?

Oftentimes the original die-hards for a product are no longer its current audience.  Strong research on changing demographics brings the new market to the forefront.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to the mobile PC market. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provide solid answers to the following questions as well as many others.

  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • Are mobile computers used longer or shorter than desktops? If so, what’s the difference, and who uses them longest?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • How does PC and online usage vary cross segments such as workplace company size or industry?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Used/Refurbished PCs – who buys them?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • What are the leading PC brands among Hewlett Packard printer users?  How does this differ for the other major printer vendors?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • How is HP’s PC penetration within the overall HP footprint?
  • Birth order = brand order? Does top brand have similar draw cross-countries?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Which operating systems dominate within which segments?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows and Blackberry users?
  • What’s typically bundled with a PC?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • When do you grow up and give up on your Apple? When do get one again, if you do?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within brand segment?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How much is assisted navigation part of life – and on which platform?
  • To what extent have Dell and Lexmark penetrated the printer market? Which segments have they penetrated?
  • What is Hewlett Packard’s share among Dell computer owners and Dell or Lexmark printer owners and has this changed?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • How do consumer attitudes about purchasing technology differ between Apple, Hewlett Packard and Dell customers?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What do users sync or store in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • Which segments are utilizing the cloud? For which activities?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers?  For which activities?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How does Hewlett Packard’s market share differ between the different types of printers (inkjet, multifunction, laser, etc.)?
  • What other items (printers, software, monitors/displays, extended service plan, etc.) do people typically buy with their PC purchase?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • What’s the likely near-term outcome for an OS upgrade?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • What happens to old PCs? Are they dumped? Recycled? Sold? Which segments dispose in which way?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • Navigation, online maps, location-based mobile phone services, and GPS – who’s getting directions?
  • How do ad volumes affect usage?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of  Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Statistics, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

Communicating – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

fExtensive research information about communication is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

It’s been decades since Marvin Gaye “heard it through the grapevine,” and there are more “grapevines” today than you can shake a stick at.  It’s important to know which one your target audience uses–social networking, email, texting?  Do they grab their cellphone or type a text or email? How do they combine or trade off these modes of communication? TUP’s research gives you demographic and market details that might easily be overlooked, and that can be the difference between having a well-defined market or missing out.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to communication. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it offers ready, solid answers to the following and many other key questions.

  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Is email dying because of ads? Being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows and Blackberry users?
  • How do ad volumes affect usage?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How do Verizon’s subscribers compare to AT&T’s?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • Which activities are different for dial-up than broadband? What’s driving bandwidth needs?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • What do users sync or store in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Do users find their PCs to be more useful or less useful? Which users are the most practically-oriented?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • What are the most common documents (maps, spreadsheets, photos, etc.) that consumers print on their ink-jet printers? How about their laser printers?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Which segments are utilizing the cloud? For which activities?
  • How are users incorporating digital images, through the use of digital cameras, scanners, downloading images, as well as how are they producing output?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of the Technology User Profile Global Insights Edition may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple-PC Household, Statistics, Tech Market, Technology, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010

Mobile Phones – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about mobile phones is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Both smartphone and basic feature phones today are much more than a phone.  At least, they can be.  With all the capabilities of the modern mobile device, it can be difficult to discern what exactly which consumers are after which capabilities, and what they ultimately use.  Do they use their phone for the texting, for the web, or as a PDA?  As a camera or a gaming tool?  Or do they use it mostly as a traditional telephone?  These questions beg for extensive answers that only careful, detailed market research can provide.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to mobile phones. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides answers to these and many other key questions.

  • Video-calling: is this becoming a regular Smartphone activity? Who’s doing this with which brand and carrier?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android, Windows and Blackberry users?
  • How do the market segments of mobile phone platforms vary?
  • How are smartphones challenging mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • How have PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities changed? How might this affect apps?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • What is the impact on privacy in use of social networking?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which align with which platforms?
  • Is email dying because of ads? Being replaced by alternatives such as social networking, texting, or IM?
  • Are Apple’s best customers really unique?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Which segments are using which devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • What’s the expected market demand for a Google Droid – Verizon – Motorola trio?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Multitasking – who’s using lots of devices for lots of apps, few devices many apps, etc.?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • What is surprisingly strong “killer app” on both basic mobile phones and smartphones?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • How do Verizon’s subscribers compare to AT&T’s?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Are mobile computers used longer or shorter than desktops? If so, what’s the difference, and who uses them longest?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How strong is name-brand dominance?
  • How social-network active are the various tiers of gamers?
  • Which social networking sites are used most frequently by which segments?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How does this differ between mobile phones and PCs? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Which market segments are dating online? What else do they frequently do online?
  • Which market segments are renting movies? Are they renting DVDs at a retailer, by mail, or at a kiosk? Do they watch them online?
  • What about the unemployed? Are they more or are they less tech-focused?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How tech-sophisticated are game-players, within key gaming segments?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Which industry groups have varied levels of adoption?
  • In reality, how deeply has the Apple iPod penetrated the market, and into which market segments?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Is social networking only for certain age groups?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • How much is assisted navigation part of life – and on which platform?
  • What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? High-bandwidth or dial-up? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
    What are consumers planning to buy? (in consumer electronics, connected home, computers, Internet, etc.)
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use film cameras?
  • Navigation, online maps, location-based mobile phone services, and GPS – who’s getting directions?
  • What are the overall future trends for the Internet?
  • How are users incorporating digital images, through the use of digital cameras, scanners, downloading images, as well as how are they producing output?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • Netbooks – how soon and with which market segments?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

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The above questions are answered with the TUP 2010 edition, and even more questions are answered in the TUP 2011 edition.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2009, TUP 2010