Category Archives: Statistics

What is the penetration of home-owned computing devices? (MetaFAQs)

Mobile phones dominate home-owned connected devices as the ones used by the greatest number of U.S. adults. As of our MetaFacts TUP 2016 US survey, 87% of U.S. adults used a smartphone or basic cell phone that was home-owned. Slightly trailing mobile phones, 81% of adults use a home PC. Media tablets are a distant third place, at 63% of U.S. adults.

MetaFacts defines home-owned devices as those which were acquired with personal funds. As released in our other MetaFacts TUP research, a substantial share of U.S. adults also use employer-provided, self-employment, school-owned, public, or other devices which are owned by someone other than themselves.metafacts-mq0137-250-dev_key-2017-02-22_09-32-36

Within mobile phones, home-owned smartphones outnumber home-owned basic cell phones, with nearly two-thirds (72%) of U.S. adults using a smartphone and just over one-fourth (27%) using a basic cell phone.

Among home PCs, desktops and Microsoft Windows PCs dominate. Home notebooks have grown to reach almost half (49%) of U.S. adults. Although the tech-savvy consider Windows XP and Vista PCs to be passé and even dangerously unprotected from malware, 4% of U.S. adults are still actively using Home PCs with these operating systems. While adoption of tech products can often be rapid, retirement of older technology from the active installed base can take much longer than many may expect.

Among home media tablets, tablets such as Apple’s iPad have higher penetration than e-Book Readers such as Amazon’s Kindles.

Looking ahead, we expect slowing growth rates for PCs, mobile, phones, and tablets as happens when penetration approaches market saturation. Certain life stage market segments are likely to keep their basic cell phones active for years, partly delaying a shift due to perceptions of smartphones being complex or expensive, and partly due to simple inertia. This will further reinforce smartphones as being a replacement market. Home PC penetration rates have not declined measurably as an increasing number of customers switch between desktops, notebooks or convertibles, and newer all-in-one form factors. The penetration of tablets, while recently tapering, may see a resurgence should a broader class of tech users discover that they can do enough of their preferred activities on tablets. We expect the majority of home tablet users to be from within those who are already using smartphones and PCs.

Source

This MetaFAQ #mq0137 is based on TUP 2016 US table 250 DEV_KEYxLIFE – 2016 Key Devices by Life Stage . This is based on our most recent research among 7,336 US adults as part of the Technology User Profile (TUP) 2016 survey.

This MetaFAQs research result addresses one of the many questions profiling active technology users.

Many other related research answers are part of the TUP service, available to paid subscribers. The TUP sections with the most information about home device penetration are the Technology User Profile Chapter and the Devices Chapter.

These MetaFAQs are brought to you by MetaFacts, based on research results from their most-recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Related Resources

  • Chapter A User Profile
    • Section: A1-OV/Overview
    • Section: A2-DE/Demographic Overview
    • Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage
    • Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges
    • Section: A9-AGEGEN/Age, Gender
  • Chapter D Devices
    • Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations
    • Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems
    • Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS
  • Chapter E PCs
    • Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs

Related MetaFAQs

 

MetaFAQ Question Cross-Reference
mq0037 What is the average number of Printers used by Home PC users? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [410 PRxHFPC] Printers
mq0039 Who owns the printers millennials use at a higher rate than average? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A9-AGEGEN/Age, Gender  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGEGEN] Key Device Metrics
mq0063 Who are the Apple-only users? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_ECO] Respondent Demographics
mq0091 What is the percent of Home PC users that use printers? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE] Key Device Metrics
mq0213 How does the penetration of OS Ecosystems vary by device type? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDEV_ECO] Key Device Metrics
mq0218 Is there an age skew for Windows 7 Home PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGE] Key Device Metrics
mq0220 Is there an age skew for Apple iPads? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGE] Key Device Metrics
mq0236 What is the average number of Home PCs being used? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [490 UNITSxLIFE] Units
mq0237 What is the average number of Home Tablets being used? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [490 UNITSxLIFE] Units
mq0254 Are Smartphone users more or less likely to be using a Tablet PC? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [340 TABxOV] Tablet PCs
mq0257 Which Life Stage segment spends the most on tech devices and services? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A3-LIFE/Life Stage  Tables: [790 SPENDxLIFE] Tech Spending
mq0345 Are older or younger employees more likely to use Desktop PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [150 USAGExOV] Usage Profile
mq0365 What is the mix of devices that people actively use? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [150 USAGExOV] Usage Profile
mq0473 Which are the leading OS for actively-used Home PCs? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [830 HPCxHFPC] Home PCs
mq0507 Which age group has the highest usage of Notebook PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A2-DE/Demographic Overview  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDE] Key Device Metrics
mq0569 How do the 1st and 2nd-most popular combination of devices compare in average number of devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [490 UNITSxCOMBO] Units
mq0588 How many Home PCs were acquired Used/Refurbished? Chapter: E PCs  Section: E2-HFPC/Home Family PCs  Tables: [830 HPCxHFPC] Home PCs
mq0643 Which segments use the most connected devices? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [490 UNITSxOV] Units
mq0674 How many adults use a Windows device? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_ECO] Universe-Online Adults
mq0676 How many adults use a Smartphone using Apple iOS, Google Android, or Windows? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics
mq0677 How many adults use a Tablet using Apple iOS, Google Android, or Windows? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics

 

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Filed under Basic cell phones, Consumer research, Convertibles, Desktops, Devices, e-Book Readers, Market Research, Market Sizing, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Smartphones, Statistics, Tablets, TUP 2016

Shifts Ahead in the Windows Installed Base (TUPdate)

Shifts Ahead in the Windows Installed Base – Dan Ness, November 3, 2016

Any large installed base doesn’t always stay that way. Fickle customers continue experimenting and switching between platforms and ecosystems. Microsoft continues to meet challenges from Apple, Google, and countless others, as users continue their quest for what they see as the best. Despite the size and breadth of the installed base, Microsoft’s customers for certain products and services are not as average as may be expected.

Actively Used Windows Devices by Type

Understanding just how large the Windows installed base is begins with some basic measurements. How many adults use Windows OS devices, and which types of devices dominate?metafacts-metafaqs-mq0674-2016-11-03_12-22-31

Most American adults use a Windows device, with 170.4 million using some type of key connected device. This means more than three-quarters (78%) of American adults use any combination of one or more Windows PCs, Smartphones or Tablets.

This level of dominance appears to spell strong security for Microsoft. It’s important to look one level more deeply – to the types of devices being actively used which are and aren’t using Windows.

Another 47.8 million adults are actively using a connected device using any other operating system than Windows. This defines a substantial portion of the market outside of Microsoft’s Windows ecosystem.

Microsoft Windows’s strongest domain is on Desktop and Notebook PCs. 166.3 million adults actively use a Windows PC, while 27.6 million only use a PC (or Mac) that doesn’t run Windows.

When it comes to Smartphones, Microsoft Windows hasn’t made a substantial lasting presence. Of the 170.6 million adults using a Smartphone, only 4.5 million use a Windows Smartphone.

Tablets have been stronger for Microsoft, especially with its relatively recent release of the Microsoft Surface line. Of the 132.9 million US adults who regularly use a Tablet, 25.6 million run Windows.

Size of the Active PC Installed Base

How many adults use PCs, and which operating systems dominate?metafacts-metafaqs-mq0675-2016-11-02_12-54-40

PCs continue to dominate the collection of connected devices in active use. 193.9 million adult Americans use a Windows, Mac or Google Chrome OS PC. There are connected adults who don’t use a PC, and these number 24.3 million.

The lion’s share of adults actively use PCs running Microsoft Windows. 166.3 million adults actively use a Windows PC, while 27.6 million only use an Apple Mac or Chromebook.

Apple has a much smaller share of adults who use one of their Macs or MacBooks. 44.4 million adults actively use an Apple PC. There is an overlap of 24.2 million adults, meaning that over half of Apple MacOS users also actively use a Windows PC. Looked at from Microsoft’s perspective, only 15% of Windows users actively use an Apple PC.

Google’s Chrome OS PCs have a nominal share. 3.1 million adults actively use a Google OS PC.

Size of the Active Smartphone Installed Base

How many adults use Smartphones, and which operating systems dominate?metafacts-metafaqs-mq0676-2016-11-03_10-10-23

170.7 million adult Americans use a Smartphone, using Google Android, Apple, Windows or any other OS. At 78% of connected adults, this penetration is very high.

Another 47.5 million use a connected device other than a Smartphone. We expect most these holdouts, many of whom are using Basic feature phones, to eventually migrate to a Smartphone, if begrudgingly.

However, the majority of new Smartphone sales will be into a replacement market, as subscribers update their handsets.

Google Android leads now in Smartphones. With 80.8 million adults million adults actively use a Google Android Smartphone, this is slightly higher than Apple’s 77.8 million adult iPhone users. Microsoft Windows phones, however, are only in the hands of 4.5 million connected adults.

Size of the Active Tablet Installed Base

132.9 million adults are using at least one Tablet, leaving 85.3 million connected adults not actively using one.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0677-2016-11-03_10-47-14

Apple’s iPad has the largest share of the installed base, with 63 million active users. Apple’s share, however, has been shrinking with broader acceptance of increasingly sophisticated and more heavily marketed tables using Android and Windows.

With 36 million Android Tablet users, Google has a strong base, even if well behind Apple’s.

Windows, with 25.6 million users, lags behind both leaders. However, considering that Windows Surface tablets were released starting in 2012, expanding to this size base is impressive.

The Shifting Desktop PC OS Share

The current installed base of Desktop PCs is dominated by Microsoft Windows.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0678-2016-11-03_12-13-15

Apple has started to make inroads with its Macs. Among the newest Desktop PCs in the installed based, , Apple’s share is effectively one-in-five, at 21%. This is stronger than Apple Macs in the installed base which were acquired in 2015, where Apple’s share is one-in-six, at 17%.

The Shifting Notebook PC OS Share

The current installed base of Notebook PCs continues to be dominated by Microsoft Windows. Apple has gained a substantial share, with nearly one-quarter (24%) of the installed base.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0679-2016-11-03_12-18-03

Historically, Apple has been very strong among younger adults, especially students. In fact, while 77% of adult students use some type of Windows PC, this is a smaller share than the average adult. At the same time, one-third (33%) of students use at least one type of Apple Desktop or Notebook, a share substantially higher than the national rate of 23%.

Google’s Chromebooks, although have achieved broad media attention, are only being actively used by very few users. Among adults using Notebooks acquired in the first half of 2016, Google’s share is 3%, and 4% for those acquired in 2015.

The Shifting Smartphone OS Share

Microsoft only has a sliver of the Smartphone market. The current installed base of Smartphones in the US is dominated by Google (Android) and Apple (iOS).metafacts-metafaqs-mq0680-2016-11-03_11-40-58

In the total active installed base, Google has a nearly-identical share to Apple.

Looking more deeply into which OS dominates newer phones in the US, Google has the largest share. Just over half – 55% – of Smartphones acquired in the first half of 2016 are using Google Android. That’s up from half (50%) of Smartphones acquired in 2015, and even lower shares in older Smartphones.

Windows Smartphones are ranked 3rd, with a nominal share that’s been declining.

The Shifting Tablet OS Share

Microsoft Windows has a fresher share of the installed base of actively used tablets than ever before. Despite that, Windows tablets are ranked 3rd behind Apple iOS and Google Android.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0681-2016-11-03_11-52-08

Apple’s iPad is the darling of Tablets, currently with the dominant share of the installed base of actively used tablets in the US.

However, Apple’s dominance has been challenged by both Microsoft and Google Android tablets. Apple’s share is still dominant among recently-acquired Tablets, and yet the trend isn’t favorable. Apple has its largest share among older tablets actively used in the installed base.

Google Android & Chrome OS tablets have a share growing towards Apple’s, and are a substantial threat to both Microsoft and Apple.

Looking Ahead

We’ve found predictive power in looking at tech purchase plans in the context of what they are already using. Among other factors, habit and inertia are strong among many consumers.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0682-2016-11-03_13-53-46

Google has some positive prospects. Consumers who have been avoiding Google devices make up the strongest segment planning to buy a Chromebook, and are relatively strong for Android Tablets and Smartwatches. It’s not surprising that another strong segment for Chromebooks are those avid tech device collectors who have all 3 major OS families – Windows, Apple, and Google.

Plans for Apple products, however, aren’t showing strong growth prospects outside of Apple’s base. Apple avoiders are one of the smallest segments with plans to buy an Apple iPad, iPhone, or Apple Watch. There is home from the accumulators – those active consumers who are using all three OS.

Purchase plans for Microsoft Windows Smartphones are coming from a mixture of the converted and departed. Nearly as many are Google avoiders as have all 3 OS. Also Windows-only devotees have plans to stay within the fold for their next Smartphone.

Looking ahead, Microsoft’s recent desktop PC announcement with the Surface Studio was received favorably by many tech reporters and analysts. Although most likely to be bought by high-end creatives, technology-laden products like this can have a halo effect on franchises like Windows, lending them an advanced aura. This sizzle, in turn, can help stem the tide of users who have been switching away from Windows.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). Trend information is based on prior waves. For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

The TUP 2016 Devices Chapter details device combinations, as well as device primacy, OS Ecosystems, brand footprint, and other key analysis points.

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Filed under Basic cell phones, Desktops, Market Sizing, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Smartphones, Statistics, Tablets, Tech Market, TUP 2016, TUPdate

One in Six Connected Adults Use Windows XP On Their Primary Home PC

On April 8th, 2014, Microsoft will discontinue extended support for Windows XP. There is a substantial installed base of Home-owned Windows XP PCs being actively used in the U.S.

These users are not just a handful of stragglers, hanging on to get the last nickel of value from their old, tired PCs. In fact, they are active users of a wide variety of tech products and also big spenders on digital media, tech services, and consumer electronics.

[Photo courtesy xcaballe under a Creative Commons license]

[Photo courtesy xcaballe under a Creative Commons license]

Based on the latest research from MetaFacts, one in six (17%) Connected US Adults are using a Windows XP Home PC as their primary PC. Just over one-fifth (21%) of Connected US Adults are using a Windows XP Home PC as their primary or other connected Home PC.

Although the Windows XP Operating System was released in 2001, it continues to remain in active use following the release of more than one version of Microsoft Windows.

Home XP PC users are regularly using their PCs for a wide range of activities, and most are using other PCs, Smartphones, Tablets, and other connected devices in addition to their Windows XP Home PC. The full TUP research details the demographics, behavioral, and tech usage profile characteristics which uniquely differentiate this market segment.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2013 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 31st continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.

For this analysis, two types of Home Windows XP PC-using adults were defined: “Any Windows XP Home PC” which are those adults who use a Home-owned Windows XP PC as any of their connected devices and “Home PC #1 – Operating System Version” which are those individuals who use a Home-owned Windows XP PC as their primary PC (the PC which they use the most often).

An active connected device is defined in TUP as one which has been connected to the Internet to check email or to open an Internet browser in the prior 90 days.

In addition to tracking the operating system of actively used connected devices, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t updated) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more Windows XP users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

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Filed under Market Research, Statistics, Tech Market, TUP 2013, TUPdate

Half of Smartphones being used by Millennials, lead by HTC not Apple (TUPtip)

(a TUPtip from MetaFacts – October 12, 2012)

Just over half (51%) of Smartphones used by online U.S. adults are being used by Millennials, according to the latest survey results from Metafacts Technology User Profile.

These subscribers born between 1977 and 1994 and age 18-35, make up the highest share of HTC Smartphones, and index at 115, with a statistically higher share than Apple, Samsung, LG, Motorola, or RIM, at a 99% confidence level.

Among major smartphone brands, RIM has the lowest share of Millennial subscribers. Instead, their highest share is among Younger Baby Boomers (born 1955-1964, age 48-57).

Current Technology User Profile 2012 subscribers can access this information in the Mobile Phones and Smartphone sections of the Mobile Phones Chapter, or use MarketSight to dive more deeply into which market segments have the highest and lowest penetration.

We suggest reviewing the tech spending patterns of Millennials versus other groups, as well as their employment status and mobile phone churn intention.

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Filed under Mobile Phones, Statistics, TUP 2012, TUPtip

Buying Behavior – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about buying behavior is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

The retail adage: “buyers vote with their feet” is a reflection of old thinking, just as “new buyers vote with their mouse clicks” shows the same partial thinking. Up-to-date technology marketers and researchers know well how important it is to understand the full view of buyers. Consumers are influenced by many screens – and only having one view misses out on the true picture. After all, buyers have many choices and demonstrate time and time again their willingness to change.

Consumers have expanded, contracted, sidestepped, and evolved their buying behaviors. Retail has defied the proclamations of its doom and yet is not what it used to be. As tech buyers continue to change their tastes and preferences, they have tried many different types of channels. The changes are far from over.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to buying behavior. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • How do consumer attitudes about purchasing technology differ between Apple, Hewlett Packard and Dell customers?
  • To what extent do tech shoppers focus on certain channels for certain products versus staying with a smaller number of outlets?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • Where do people buy their printer supplies?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • Where are printer users buying their printer supplies? Are these the same channels as where they buy their printers?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How strong is name-brand dominance?
  • What is the frequency of printer consumables purchase?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • What other items (printers, software, monitors/displays, extended service plan, etc.) do people typically buy with their PC purchase?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies? How do Best Buy customers compare to Office Depot of Staples shoppers?
  • What’s typically bundled with a PC?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Beyond paper or plastic: which types of ink & toner are printer users buying? New or refilled? Original or competitor?
  • What about the anti-social – those that aren’t in an online social network? Who are they? In what other ways are they actively communicating and having fun? How does their spending profile compare?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Used/Refurbished PCs – who buys them?
  • How many seniors are online? How is their behavior different than younger online users?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Do mobile PC users print differently than desktop users? Do the more-mobile use more or fewer printers? Do the more-mobile print different content?
  • Which segments have recently paid for a downloaded mobile phone app?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment? By tech spending behavior?

If solid answers to any of these example questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full datasets.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2012 edition, and most are also answered in the TUP 2011 edition for ready trend comparison.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012