Category Archives: Tablets

How Do (They) Love Thee? Follow Their Brand Footprints

How Do (They) Love Thee? Follow Their Brand Footprints – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, March 17, 2017

“How Do I Love Thee? Let me count the ways.” So begins the 43rd of Elizabeth Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese. After more than 160 years, this poetry still inspires.
This classic poem seems fitting for a research-based understanding of customer loyalty and, well, mutual loyalty and love. One might hope that love and loyalty would flow in both directions – between customers and company – and in turn would result in more delighted customers, better products and services, and more customers actively using more of a brand’s offerings. In addition to brand footprint measures such as market size and intensity, MetaFacts measures the shape, loyalty, and quality of technology users.

Apple’s Intensity Up and To the Right

Apple’s customers now rank highest in average number of Apple devices, an elemental measure of brand footprint, reflecting in part the intensity of customer’s involvement. When customers use more than one of a brand’s offerings, it reflects the value customers see and their depth of customer loyalty. Based on our most recent wave of Technology User Profile (TUP), Apple’s customers are actively using an average of 2.18 devices, spanning Macs, iPhones, iPads, an Apple TV box, Apple Watch, or some combination. Only one year earlier, our TUP 2015 wave reported that Apple’s device average was effectively on par with the footprint of Microsoft Windows devices.
Between 2014 and 2016, HP and Google Android/Chrome OS devices have seen their customer’s active device averages erode as Apple’s has gained. This is due in part to consumers abandoning older Google Android Tablets. Dell’s average rose slightly in 2015, only to sag slightly by 2016.

Breadth Coupled With Intensity

Breadth of usage, or market penetration, is another dimension of brand footprint. Coupled with intensity – as expressed by the average number of actively-used devices – a more complete view is clearer.

In market breadth and intensity, Windows devices are head and shoulders above other brands. Windows is in the upper-right quadrant for both measures. The long-time established brand continues to have the largest number of active users and above-average mean number of actively-used devices.
Apple stands out for having a market penetration on par with tech majors HP, Google, and Dell, yet with a strongly higher usage intensity. Their fewer, if mightier, customers have more Apple products than any other platform. In a quadrant to themselves, Apple’s expansion in active usage sets the stage for additional expanded offerings to their loyal customers, ranging from devices to subscription services.

The Brand Footprint Mix

The Apple brand has, for most of its history, been a specialized brand, purposely positioned as “different”. This skimming strategy has been well-supported by Apple’s focus on proprietary integration over standards managed by others. Apple’s current brand footprint robust when looking at the total number of devices in use as well as the balance of products in its actively-used mix. Google’s Android/Chrome mix is similarly broad, yet is smaller. Among US technology users, Google is playing a me-too catchup game to Apple’s broadly balanced acceptance.

HP’s and Dell’s brand footprints are composed of two product types, demonstrating what might be alternatively called a disciplined focus or a lack of diverse breadth. HP’s persistent dominance in Printers is unrivaled by Dell, or competitors Epson, Canon, or Brother. Dell’s footprint in PCs is only slightly larger than HP’s.
The strength of the Windows brand footprint is based on PCs. Only recently have Windows Tablets started making their mark, and promise to continue to challenge Apple’s dominant iPad and Google’s 2nd-ranked Tablets . Windows Smartphones are on the way out, with a usage base declining in the face of Apple iOS and Android.
HP solidly dominates Printer usage. While years ago Dell challenged HP when it entered the printer business, Dell’s current brand footprint is puny in comparison. HP’s PC business, while nearly equal to Dell’s, is similarly being challenged by Apple’s broadening usage.
Apple’s entire brand footprint is benefitting from recent acceptance of two newish categories – smart watches and TV boxes. Although Google is on par with Apple in these categories, collectively these products are expanding Apple’s footprint into users they otherwise haven’t reached.

Looking ahead

It takes much more than a brand halo to convert fickle customers into loyal ones. Much effort goes into the design, manufacturing, distribution, promotion, and integration of products and services.
While Apple and Google are working hard to further their OS against Windows, smoother integration can attract and hold customers longer than an OS alone. Presently, Apple’s MacOS and iOS aren’t fully compatible, a difference which may become more important to the growing number of Apple customers actively using both iPads and Macs. Google’s Android and Chrome OS offerings face a similar conundrum, with even less OS consistency due to the many versions in active use.
Beyond OS ecosystems, technology companies are also seeking other ways of winning groups of customers. Google, Amazon, and Microsoft and joining Apple in racing to be the user’s choice for a voice assisted experience. Amazon’s recent release of Alexa on iOS is Amazon’s bid to establish dominance among voice assistants, and helping to support not only Amazon’s shopping footprint, but also their many other gateway products such as the Amazon Echo or Dot.
Pragmatically speaking, what matters is having customers and that they use many of a brand’s products and services. Measuring brand footprint by penetration and intensity are suitable metrics to measure market success both in size and quality. These metrics may be better than waiting for customers to compose love poems of “the depth and breadth and height” of their ardor for the brand.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US), as well as two previous waves. For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.
This TUPdate was based on results in the TUP Chapter – Devices, Section FOOT/Brand Footprint and Section DEV_ECO/Device Ecosystems from TUP 2014, TUP 2015, and TUP 2016. Other related results include Section VOICEASST – Voice Assistant in TUP 2016 Chapter – Wearables, Hearables, Listening and Speaking.

Related MetaFAQs

The following related MetaFAQs address questions included in this TUPdate.

MetaFAQs Question TUP Reference
mq0004 Who are the biggest spenders – Apple’s, Dell’s, HP’s, or Google’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [790 SPENDxFOOT] Tech Spending
mq0008 How much does the HP printer footprint overlap Canon, Epson, and Brother? Chapter: K Printers  Section: K2-PRH_BRANDS/Home Printer Brands  Tables: [411 PR1xPRH_BRANDS] Printer #1
mq0022 How many Apple iPhone users have older iPhones or contracts? Chapter: H Mobile Phones  Section: H2-SP1/Smartphone #1  Tables: [390 SPxSP1] Smartphones
mq0044 How does the mix of device activities vary between Apple’s, Google’s, HP’s, and Dell’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [570 ACT_COMMxFOOT] Communication Activities
mq0052 How does the mix of device activities vary between Apple’s, Google’s, HP’s, and Dell’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [610 ACT_CLOUDxFOOT] Cloud Storage/Sharing Activities
mq0135 Are the highest share of Millennials in Apple’s footprint, Google’s, or Dell’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [120 DRxFOOT] Respondent Demographics
mq0142 How demographically similar are Apple’s best customers to Google’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [120 DRxFOOT] Respondent Demographics
mq0151 Who have the most Connected Devices – Apple’s best customers, Google’s, HP’s, or Dell’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [490 UNITSxFOOT] Units
mq0182 Which brand footprint has the highest share of full-time-employeds? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [120 DRxFOOT] Respondent Demographics
mq0248 Who has the newest Smartphones – Apple’s best customers or Google’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [390 SPxFOOT] Smartphones
mq0258 How does the mix of devices differ between HP’s, Apple’s, Dell’s, Google’s, and LG’s footprint? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxFOOT] Key Device Metrics
mq0264 Who’s most likely to have an Apple iPhone – HP’s best customers or Dell’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [390 SPxFOOT] Smartphones
mq0272 How demographically similar are Apple’s best customers to Google’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [130 DHxFOOT] Household Demographics
mq0285 Are newer Smartphones used differently than older Smartphones? Chapter: H Mobile Phones  Section: H2-SP1/Smartphone #1  Tables: [390 SPxSP1] Smartphones
mq0325 Who have the most Windows devices – Apple’s best customers or Google’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [270 DEVxFOOT] Devices
mq0326 Which products do Apple’s best customers have fewer of? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxFOOT] Key Device Metrics
mq0334 Are Apple’s best customers more or less likely than average to be using a Workplace PC? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [280 PCxFOOT] PCs
mq0340 Do Apple’s best customers use their PCs for more or fewer hours than average PC users? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [280 PCxFOOT] PCs
mq0344 Who has the biggest purchase intentions – Apple’s or Google’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [810 PLANSxFOOT] Purchase Plans
mq0353 How does the mix of Connected Devices vary by Brand Footprint? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [490 UNITSxFOOT] Units
mq0356 Are Dell’s or HP’s customers more likely to have a Smartphone? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxFOOT] Key Device Metrics
mq0476 How far have Tablets penetrated HP’s and Dell’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [340 TABxFOOT] Tablet PCs
mq0680 How does the Smartphone OS share vary by age of PC? Chapter: X Custom  Section: X-CUSTOM/Custom  Tables: [390 SPxCUSTOM] Smartphones
mq0698 Which are used more often for a Voice Assistant, iPhones or Android Smartphones? Chapter: I Wearables, Hearables, Listening & Speaking  Section: I3-VOICEASST/Voice Assistance  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxVOICEASST] Key Device Metrics
mq0004 Who are the biggest spenders – Apple’s, Dell’s, HP’s, or Google’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [790 SPENDxFOOT] Tech Spending
mq0008 How much does the HP printer footprint overlap Canon, Epson, and Brother? Chapter: K Printers  Section: K2-PRH_BRANDS/Home Printer Brands  Tables: [411 PR1xPRH_BRANDS] Printer #1
mq0022 How many Apple iPhone users have older iPhones or contracts? Chapter: H Mobile Phones  Section: H2-SP1/Smartphone #1  Tables: [390 SPxSP1] Smartphones
mq0044 How does the mix of device activities vary between Apple’s, Google’s, HP’s, and Dell’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [570 ACT_COMMxFOOT] Communication Activities
mq0052 How does the mix of device activities vary between Apple’s, Google’s, HP’s, and Dell’s best customers? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [610 ACT_CLOUDxFOOT] Cloud Storage/Sharing Activities
mq0135 Are the highest share of Millennials in Apple’s footprint, Google’s, or Dell’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [120 DRxFOOT] Respondent Demographics
mq0142 How demographically similar are Apple’s best customers to Google’s? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D4-FOOT/Brand Footprint  Tables: [120 DRxFOOT] Respondent Demographics

 

 

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What is the penetration of home-owned computing devices? (MetaFAQs)

Mobile phones dominate home-owned connected devices as the ones used by the greatest number of U.S. adults. As of our MetaFacts TUP 2016 US survey, 87% of U.S. adults used a smartphone or basic cell phone that was home-owned. Slightly trailing mobile phones, 81% of adults use a home PC. Media tablets are a distant third place, at 63% of U.S. adults.

MetaFacts defines home-owned devices as those which were acquired with personal funds. As released in our other MetaFacts TUP research, a substantial share of U.S. adults also use employer-provided, self-employment, school-owned, public, or other devices which are owned by someone other than themselves.metafacts-mq0137-250-dev_key-2017-02-22_09-32-36

Within mobile phones, home-owned smartphones outnumber home-owned basic cell phones, with nearly two-thirds (72%) of U.S. adults using a smartphone and just over one-fourth (27%) using a basic cell phone.

Among home PCs, desktops and Microsoft Windows PCs dominate. Home notebooks have grown to reach almost half (49%) of U.S. adults. Although the tech-savvy consider Windows XP and Vista PCs to be passé and even dangerously unprotected from malware, 4% of U.S. adults are still actively using Home PCs with these operating systems. While adoption of tech products can often be rapid, retirement of older technology from the active installed base can take much longer than many may expect. Continue reading

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Tablet-First. Is it a thing? (TUPdate)

Tablet-First. Is it a thing? – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, February 17, 2017

Which comes first – Smartphone? Tablet? Notebook? For a small and steadily growing segment, the tablet comes first as the primary connected device.

Over the last three years, the share of connected adults using a tablet as their primary device has expanded. In our 2014 wave of TUP, we found that 6% of adults were using a tablet as their primary device – before a PC, mobile phone, or game console. In TUP 2015, the Tablet-First rate had grown to 7% and by TUP 2016, reached 9%.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-trend-metafacts-tup-2014-2016-2017-02-16_10-02-19

It’s not as if these Tablet-First users are only using a tablet. Among Tablet-First users, half (50%) use a Smartphone as their secondary device, followed distantly by a Tower Desktop (15%), Basic cell phone (10%), and Notebook PC (9%). Continue reading

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The Most Creative – PCs or Smartphones? (TUPdate)

The Most Creative – PCs or Smartphones? – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, February 9, 2017

Creativity eludes definition, yet we know and admire it when we see or feel it. Well beyond simple clicks, creative activities greatly add to the collective oeuvre while also giving voice to expression.

It might well be argued that creativity is shown in the clever use of hashtags, emojis, or Snapchat video filters. I’m choosing to identify creativity broadly and practically – how the most-creative, most-involved tech activities get done. Activities such as creating presentations and videos require forethought and a blending of skills. Some activities such as taking photographs are now so widely commonplace that the activity spans the professional photographer to the budding amateur. So, for this analysis, I’m considering this a moderately-creative activity.metafacts-td1702-creatives-diagram-2017-02-09_13-27-42

From our most recent TUP (Technology User Profile) survey, I chose six core activities as being more creative than the many other everyday activities we track by device and user.

I drilled down into the TUP data to see what differences there may be by device type – PCs versus Smartphones. When it comes to creative activities, there are differences.

Which devices have the most users doing creative activities?

Creative activities are strongest where the tools are richest. Ask any oil painter if they benefit by having ready canvases, easels, paints, and lighting.

On first glance, mobility could support creativity, by having one’s tools handy. Creative inspirations can be elusive, so if creativity only takes place when the muse visits, then it could follow that convenient mobility matters most of all. Thinking this through more deeply, however, creativity isn’t defined by a few clicks.metafacts-td1702-creatives-by-smartphone-os-metafacts-tupdate-2017-02-08_11-18-35

When focusing on some of the most-creative activities, our TUP data shows that more people create serious content on PCs than on Smartphones. For example, for creation of personal graphics or presentations, 14% of connected adults use a PC, nearly three times the 5% rate who use their Smartphones. Similarly, 14% of connected adults use a PC for work graphics/presentations, more than triple the 4% who use their Smartphones.

Similarly, creating videos for work purposes is done with PC by twice as many adults as those using Smartphones.
Even a broad and highly personal activity category – hobbies – has a higher rate of use on PCs than on Smartphones.
Given that Smartphones have much smaller screens than most notebook PCs or desktops, it may be surprising to some that these highly-graphical creative activities have anywhere near the acceptance levels that they’re enjoying. Screen size doesn’t seem to be the entire explanation, because these creative activities have lower usage rates on Tablets than on either PCs or Smartphones.

I dove deeper into the TUP data to see if some Smartphones are associated with more creative activities than others. A slightly higher share of Apple iPhones than Android Smartphones are used for creative activities, however the difference is not statistically significant. For the most-creative activities, the difference is 2% or less.

Looking ahead

I expect PCs to continue dominating actively creative activities. Even while Smartphones are increasingly taking user’s primary attention, PCs remain primary among the set of devices being actively used. Users continue to juggle many devices, and most users actively navigate a combination which includes at least two of three devices: PCs (Desktops or Notebooks), Smartphones, or Tablets. Ninety-six percent use two or more of these, and 57% actively use three or more, up from 49% one year previously.metafacts-td1702-creatives-multiple-device-types-2017-02-09_11-18-17

I expect pan-device experience and integration to expand, helping mobile devices expand in use for creative activities. User’s abilities will increase with their growing experience working across multiple devices. A growing number of users are increasingly using the cloud to share their own work across their various devices. Furthermore, I expect creativity apps to continue to expand their ability to be used across multiple device types.
The result will be that more people will be able to create whenever and wherever the muse calls.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

This TUPdate was based on results in the TUP 2016 Chapter – Devices, Section KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices OS, Section COMBO/Device Combinations from TUP 2014, TUP 2015, and TUP 2016. Also, activity data was selected from data in PC Activities (Rows 630 ACT_PC), Smartphone Activities (Rows 700 ACT_SP), and Tablet Activities (Rows 670 ACT_TAB).

Related MetaFAQs

Also see these related MetaFAQs, the Frequently Asked Questions address by results from MetaFacts TUP:

MetaFAQ Question Cross-Reference
mq0684 How many creative pros are there, actively creating presentations and graphics? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [625 ACT_DEVxACTIMAGE] Device Activities
mq0165 Who are the most-graphical? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [120 DRxACTIMAGE] Respondent Demographics
mq0055 How are Tablets used differently than Notebook PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0056 How are Notebook PCs used differently than Tablets? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [650 ACT_NOTExOV] Notebook PC Activities
mq0536 What is the primary device for personal/productivity activities? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L8-ACTPROD/Personal/Productivity  Tables: [620 ACT_PRODxACTPROD] Personal/Productivity Activities
mq0138 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [700 ACT_SPxTAB] Smartphone Activities
mq0012 What is the profile of the most active in graphics & imaging activities? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [120 DRxACTIMAGE] Respondent Demographics
mq0181 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0551 How are Notebooks used differently than Desktop PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [650 ACT_NOTExOV] Notebook PC Activities
mq0377 What is the most popular combination of connected devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxCOMBO] Key Device Metrics
mq0574 Which device is used for the most productivity & personal activities? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [620 ACT_PRODxCOMBO] Personal/Productivity Activities
mq0655 What is the next device planned among those who own certain combinations of devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [810 PLANSxCOMBO] Purchase Plans
mq0656 Which device is used for the most cloud storage and sharing activities? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [610 ACT_CLOUDxCOMBO] Cloud Storage/Sharing Activities

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Voice Assistants – now we’re talking! (TUPdate)

Voice Assistants, now we’re talking! – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, January 27, 2017

In the early 1980’s, one of my Apple Macs overheard me on a phone call and startled me by speaking “Wouldn’t you like to know?”. The Mac’s dialog box suggested I had asked “Macintosh, do you have an Easter Egg?” Evidently, I had triggered one of those hidden messages some programmers like to include for fun. That was quite a bit earlier than today’s quirky responses after asking Apple Siri certain questions such as “What does the fox say?” or asking Amazon Alexa “how much is that doggie in the window?”

Beyond answering quirky questions, voice assistants are expected to grow in capabilities and more importantly, to grow in broader market acceptance.

Voice interaction with tech devices is back in vogue again, and technology users are different than they were 20 years ago. At CES 2017, voice assistants got a lot of attention, especially with the many IoT devices announced that used Amazon’s voice assistant Alexa.

How many voice assistant early adopters are there?metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-2017-01-27_15-28-45

The users of Amazon’s Alexa or Echo devices are currently few, while the users of voice assistants on other devices are many. As of mid-2016, 3.5 million US adults were actively using a voice-enabled speaker such as the Amazon Alexa or Echo. These are 1.6% of all Connected Adults, the universe of persons age 18 and up who have used a PC, Mobile Phone, Tablet, or Game console to browse the Internet in the previous 30 days.

The ability to control and interact by voice extends well beyond wireless voice-enabled speakers and includes Apple’s Siri, Google Now or Assistant, and Microsoft Cortana as used on PCs, Smartphones, and Tablets. This spans 75.5 million adults who regularly use their voice to control and interact with their devices. This equates to a 34.9% usage rate.metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-percent-rates-2017-01-27_15-28-45

Voice assistant usage on Mobile devices, specifically Notebook PCs, Smartphones and Tablets, are the largest group, number 61.1 million. Separately, these three platforms add to 73.6, indicating that these mobile users are using 1.2 of these devices. In other words, there is a moderate amount of overlap. This is important, because users of voice agents will likely want to choose one voice control platform. This will help them have an easier and more seamless experience so they won’t need to adapt themselves to fit each voice agent instead of the other way around.

Who are these chatty early adopters?

Users of voice assistants across any device stand out from average connected adults:

  • Respondent Demographics
    • Average age 37 – six years younger than the average connected adult
    • 54% are Millennials – age 18 to 35 – and 50% of older millennials (age 28-35) use voice control on any device
    • Use of voice-enabled speakers such as the Amazon Echo is strongest among adults age 25 to 44, and less so for 18-24 and 45+
    • Above-average usage levels for full-time students (48%) and full-time employees (43%)
    • Higher use by Asian adults (43%) and Black/African-American adults (42%)
  • Household Demographics
    • Stronger in larger households – 49% of adults in households with 4 persons and 46% among those with 5 or more
    • Stronger in households with children – 48% of adults in households with 2 or more persons and children
  • Device Usage
    • Voice assistant usage is highest among those with the most devices and less among those with fewer. Usage rates are 50% and higher among the 52% of Voice Assistant users with 6 or more devices, and 14% and below among those with 2 or fewer devicesmetafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-by-no-of-devices-2017-01-27_15-29-49
    • Users of Game Consoles have a higher than average use of Voice Assistants – 47%
    • Apple iPhone users have higher Voice Assistant usage rates (49%) across all their devices than Google Android Smartphone users (36%)
  • Operating Systems of Devices
    • Users of Voice Assistants have more Windows devices (1.8) than Apple OS devices (1.5) or Google OS devices (0.8)
  • Key Devices
    • Usage of Voice Assistants are higher than average among those using VR Headsets (84%), Home Projectors (73%), Google TV/Android TV (72%), Amazon Fire TV (69%), Apple TV (62%), Google Chromecast (61%), Wireless Headsets (67%), and any Smartwatch (69%)
  • Household spending on technology devices and services
    • Users of Voice Assistants spend much more than the average household, at 1.4x the national average

Voice Assistant usage rates on other devices

Users of voice-enabled speakers such as the Amazon Echo use voice assistants on other devices, although in a different way than average users.metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-among-speaker-users-2017-01-27_15-31-03

Users of voice-enabled wireless speakers such as the Amazon Echo are above average in using voice assistants on other devices. They are four times the national average in using voice assistance on a PC, and nearly four times (3.7x) in using a Tablet. They are more than double (2.3x) in using a mobile device (Notebook, Smartphone, or Tablet), and almost double (1.9x) in using a Smartphone.

Voice Assistant usage and device activities

So far, voice assistants have reached users who are the most broadly active with their devices. However, voice assistant usage hasn’t dominated any particular category of activities. From those users with the broadest social networking or shopping activities to those with the broadest personal and productivity activities, the most-active users are similar to each other, with each using voice assistants at nearly double the national average.

Looking ahead

Use of voice assistants have reached into the mainstream, having surpassed half of many different market segments. This widespread acceptance bodes well for voice continuing its growth. However, depth of use still has some ways to go. Users are currently juggling many devices, and using voice assistants across different devices and among differing operating system families. While this calls for a standard of some time – so users won’t need to adapt to each OS and instead each OS can adapt to them – no single standard has yet emerged.

Until more users either to choose to focus on one standard – such as staying within the Apple Siri/HomeKit family – they will continue to have the experience of speaking requests to Alexa in the ways Siri expects, to Cortana in the way Google Now or Assistant answer to, or some other combination. At least today the highly-touted artificial intelligence behind voice assistants hasn’t reached the level that one’s voice assistant would be jealous to discover you’ve been speaking with a different voice assistant.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

Comments Off on Voice Assistants – now we’re talking! (TUPdate)

Filed under Consumer research, Forward-Leaning, Operating systems, Smartphones, Tablets, TUP 2016, TUPdate