Category Archives: Smartphones

OS-Polyglots Are Big Tech Spenders (MetaFAQs)

Who are the biggest spenders – Windows-Only, Apple-Only, or some other segment? (MetaFAQs)

Google went high, Apple went higher, and Microsoft is left with the rest. That’s an oversimplification, and yet is reflected in household technology spending. Users of certain combinations of operating systems spend differently.metafacts-metafaq-mq0010-2016-11-11_11-00-43

Lowest-spending OS Combo

Adults that actively use only Microsoft Windows devices – PCs, Smartphones, or Tablets – spend less per year on technology products and services than adults who use at least one Apple or Google Android or Chrome OS device. Composed of some 36 million adults, these Windows-only one-sixth of connected adults spend $5.3k per year on their household technology products and services, from PCs and Printers, to Internet and TV service. This indexes at 67, two-thirds the average national level.

Highest-spending OS Combo

At the other end of the spectrum are those busy adults actively juggling devices with all three OS. These 27 million adults index at 134 for household technology spending, with an average annual spend of $10.6k.metafacts-metafaq-mq0010-2016-11-11_11-20-31

Looking ahead

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Filed under Convertibles, Desktops, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Operating systems, Smartphones, TUP 2016

Are most hearables being used by young males? (MetaFAQs)

Wireless headsets have been available for more than a decade, and are strongest among two age and gender groups. These hearables-active groups are also have above-average shares of VR Headset early adopters.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0100-120drxhear-2017-02-13_08-31-37

The strongest segments for active hearables use include younger males – age 18-44 and youngish females – age 25-34. Penetration is above one in four among males 25-34 (27%) and among males age 35-44 (26%). Among females, hearables usage peaks among females age 25-34, at 15%.

Looking ahead, we expect these same age & gender groups to continue as the strongest users of hearables, and don’t expect other segments to be as keen on hearables.

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Filed under Communication, Demographics & Econographics, Entertainment, Forward-Leaning, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Smartphones, TUP 2016, Usage Patterns, Video calling

The Most Creative – PCs or Smartphones? (TUPdate)

The Most Creative – PCs or Smartphones? – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, February 9, 2017

Creativity eludes definition, yet we know and admire it when we see or feel it. Well beyond simple clicks, creative activities greatly add to the collective oeuvre while also giving voice to expression.

It might well be argued that creativity is shown in the clever use of hashtags, emojis, or Snapchat video filters. I’m choosing to identify creativity broadly and practically – how the most-creative, most-involved tech activities get done. Activities such as creating presentations and videos require forethought and a blending of skills. Some activities such as taking photographs are now so widely commonplace that the activity spans the professional photographer to the budding amateur. So, for this analysis, I’m considering this a moderately-creative activity.metafacts-td1702-creatives-diagram-2017-02-09_13-27-42

From our most recent TUP (Technology User Profile) survey, I chose six core activities as being more creative than the many other everyday activities we track by device and user.

I drilled down into the TUP data to see what differences there may be by device type – PCs versus Smartphones. When it comes to creative activities, there are differences.

Which devices have the most users doing creative activities?

Creative activities are strongest where the tools are richest. Ask any oil painter if they benefit by having ready canvases, easels, paints, and lighting.

On first glance, mobility could support creativity, by having one’s tools handy. Creative inspirations can be elusive, so if creativity only takes place when the muse visits, then it could follow that convenient mobility matters most of all. Thinking this through more deeply, however, creativity isn’t defined by a few clicks.metafacts-td1702-creatives-by-smartphone-os-metafacts-tupdate-2017-02-08_11-18-35

When focusing on some of the most-creative activities, our TUP data shows that more people create serious content on PCs than on Smartphones. For example, for creation of personal graphics or presentations, 14% of connected adults use a PC, nearly three times the 5% rate who use their Smartphones. Similarly, 14% of connected adults use a PC for work graphics/presentations, more than triple the 4% who use their Smartphones.

Similarly, creating videos for work purposes is done with PC by twice as many adults as those using Smartphones.
Even a broad and highly personal activity category – hobbies – has a higher rate of use on PCs than on Smartphones.
Given that Smartphones have much smaller screens than most notebook PCs or desktops, it may be surprising to some that these highly-graphical creative activities have anywhere near the acceptance levels that they’re enjoying. Screen size doesn’t seem to be the entire explanation, because these creative activities have lower usage rates on Tablets than on either PCs or Smartphones.

I dove deeper into the TUP data to see if some Smartphones are associated with more creative activities than others. A slightly higher share of Apple iPhones than Android Smartphones are used for creative activities, however the difference is not statistically significant. For the most-creative activities, the difference is 2% or less.

Looking ahead

I expect PCs to continue dominating actively creative activities. Even while Smartphones are increasingly taking user’s primary attention, PCs remain primary among the set of devices being actively used. Users continue to juggle many devices, and most users actively navigate a combination which includes at least two of three devices: PCs (Desktops or Notebooks), Smartphones, or Tablets. Ninety-six percent use two or more of these, and 57% actively use three or more, up from 49% one year previously.metafacts-td1702-creatives-multiple-device-types-2017-02-09_11-18-17

I expect pan-device experience and integration to expand, helping mobile devices expand in use for creative activities. User’s abilities will increase with their growing experience working across multiple devices. A growing number of users are increasingly using the cloud to share their own work across their various devices. Furthermore, I expect creativity apps to continue to expand their ability to be used across multiple device types.
The result will be that more people will be able to create whenever and wherever the muse calls.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

This TUPdate was based on results in the TUP 2016 Chapter – Devices, Section KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices OS, Section COMBO/Device Combinations from TUP 2014, TUP 2015, and TUP 2016. Also, activity data was selected from data in PC Activities (Rows 630 ACT_PC), Smartphone Activities (Rows 700 ACT_SP), and Tablet Activities (Rows 670 ACT_TAB).

Related MetaFAQs

Also see these related MetaFAQs, the Frequently Asked Questions address by results from MetaFacts TUP:

MetaFAQ Question Cross-Reference
mq0684 How many creative pros are there, actively creating presentations and graphics? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [625 ACT_DEVxACTIMAGE] Device Activities
mq0165 Who are the most-graphical? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [120 DRxACTIMAGE] Respondent Demographics
mq0055 How are Tablets used differently than Notebook PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0056 How are Notebook PCs used differently than Tablets? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [650 ACT_NOTExOV] Notebook PC Activities
mq0536 What is the primary device for personal/productivity activities? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L8-ACTPROD/Personal/Productivity  Tables: [620 ACT_PRODxACTPROD] Personal/Productivity Activities
mq0138 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [700 ACT_SPxTAB] Smartphone Activities
mq0012 What is the profile of the most active in graphics & imaging activities? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L5-ACTIMAGE/Graphics/Imaging  Tables: [120 DRxACTIMAGE] Respondent Demographics
mq0181 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0551 How are Notebooks used differently than Desktop PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [650 ACT_NOTExOV] Notebook PC Activities
mq0377 What is the most popular combination of connected devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxCOMBO] Key Device Metrics
mq0574 Which device is used for the most productivity & personal activities? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [620 ACT_PRODxCOMBO] Personal/Productivity Activities
mq0655 What is the next device planned among those who own certain combinations of devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [810 PLANSxCOMBO] Purchase Plans
mq0656 Which device is used for the most cloud storage and sharing activities? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [610 ACT_CLOUDxCOMBO] Cloud Storage/Sharing Activities

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Filed under Desktops, Graphics and Image, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Smartphones, Tablets, TUP 2016, TUPdate

Is there an age skew for using VR Headsets? (MetaFAQs)

Is there an age skew for using VR Headsets?

metafacts-metafaqs-mq0047-480-cexage-2017-02-02_11-00-09Virtual reality hasn’t reached market reality, despite decades of experimentation and overhyped false starts. Recent investment has brought renewed attention, hope, and development to the prospects of widespread VR use. Based on our TUP 2016 US survey, only 2% of connected adults are actively using a VR headset, such as the Oculus Rift or Samsung Gear VR. This modest acceptance rate is only part of the research finding, though, as there is more that can be learned from the early adopters.

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Filed under Entertainment, Graphics and Image, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Smartphones, TUP 2016

Voice Assistants – now we’re talking! (TUPdate)

Voice Assistants, now we’re talking! – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, January 27, 2017

In the early 1980’s, one of my Apple Macs overheard me on a phone call and startled me by speaking “Wouldn’t you like to know?”. The Mac’s dialog box suggested I had asked “Macintosh, do you have an Easter Egg?” Evidently, I had triggered one of those hidden messages some programmers like to include for fun. That was quite a bit earlier than today’s quirky responses after asking Apple Siri certain questions such as “What does the fox say?” or asking Amazon Alexa “how much is that doggie in the window?”

Beyond answering quirky questions, voice assistants are expected to grow in capabilities and more importantly, to grow in broader market acceptance.

Voice interaction with tech devices is back in vogue again, and technology users are different than they were 20 years ago. At CES 2017, voice assistants got a lot of attention, especially with the many IoT devices announced that used Amazon’s voice assistant Alexa.

How many voice assistant early adopters are there?metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-2017-01-27_15-28-45

The users of Amazon’s Alexa or Echo devices are currently few, while the users of voice assistants on other devices are many. As of mid-2016, 3.5 million US adults were actively using a voice-enabled speaker such as the Amazon Alexa or Echo. These are 1.6% of all Connected Adults, the universe of persons age 18 and up who have used a PC, Mobile Phone, Tablet, or Game console to browse the Internet in the previous 30 days.

The ability to control and interact by voice extends well beyond wireless voice-enabled speakers and includes Apple’s Siri, Google Now or Assistant, and Microsoft Cortana as used on PCs, Smartphones, and Tablets. This spans 75.5 million adults who regularly use their voice to control and interact with their devices. This equates to a 34.9% usage rate.metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-percent-rates-2017-01-27_15-28-45

Voice assistant usage on Mobile devices, specifically Notebook PCs, Smartphones and Tablets, are the largest group, number 61.1 million. Separately, these three platforms add to 73.6, indicating that these mobile users are using 1.2 of these devices. In other words, there is a moderate amount of overlap. This is important, because users of voice agents will likely want to choose one voice control platform. This will help them have an easier and more seamless experience so they won’t need to adapt themselves to fit each voice agent instead of the other way around.

Who are these chatty early adopters?

Users of voice assistants across any device stand out from average connected adults:

  • Respondent Demographics
    • Average age 37 – six years younger than the average connected adult
    • 54% are Millennials – age 18 to 35 – and 50% of older millennials (age 28-35) use voice control on any device
    • Use of voice-enabled speakers such as the Amazon Echo is strongest among adults age 25 to 44, and less so for 18-24 and 45+
    • Above-average usage levels for full-time students (48%) and full-time employees (43%)
    • Higher use by Asian adults (43%) and Black/African-American adults (42%)
  • Household Demographics
    • Stronger in larger households – 49% of adults in households with 4 persons and 46% among those with 5 or more
    • Stronger in households with children – 48% of adults in households with 2 or more persons and children
  • Device Usage
    • Voice assistant usage is highest among those with the most devices and less among those with fewer. Usage rates are 50% and higher among the 52% of Voice Assistant users with 6 or more devices, and 14% and below among those with 2 or fewer devicesmetafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-by-no-of-devices-2017-01-27_15-29-49
    • Users of Game Consoles have a higher than average use of Voice Assistants – 47%
    • Apple iPhone users have higher Voice Assistant usage rates (49%) across all their devices than Google Android Smartphone users (36%)
  • Operating Systems of Devices
    • Users of Voice Assistants have more Windows devices (1.8) than Apple OS devices (1.5) or Google OS devices (0.8)
  • Key Devices
    • Usage of Voice Assistants are higher than average among those using VR Headsets (84%), Home Projectors (73%), Google TV/Android TV (72%), Amazon Fire TV (69%), Apple TV (62%), Google Chromecast (61%), Wireless Headsets (67%), and any Smartwatch (69%)
  • Household spending on technology devices and services
    • Users of Voice Assistants spend much more than the average household, at 1.4x the national average

Voice Assistant usage rates on other devices

Users of voice-enabled speakers such as the Amazon Echo use voice assistants on other devices, although in a different way than average users.metafacts-voice-assistant-usage-rates-among-speaker-users-2017-01-27_15-31-03

Users of voice-enabled wireless speakers such as the Amazon Echo are above average in using voice assistants on other devices. They are four times the national average in using voice assistance on a PC, and nearly four times (3.7x) in using a Tablet. They are more than double (2.3x) in using a mobile device (Notebook, Smartphone, or Tablet), and almost double (1.9x) in using a Smartphone.

Voice Assistant usage and device activities

So far, voice assistants have reached users who are the most broadly active with their devices. However, voice assistant usage hasn’t dominated any particular category of activities. From those users with the broadest social networking or shopping activities to those with the broadest personal and productivity activities, the most-active users are similar to each other, with each using voice assistants at nearly double the national average.

Looking ahead

Use of voice assistants have reached into the mainstream, having surpassed half of many different market segments. This widespread acceptance bodes well for voice continuing its growth. However, depth of use still has some ways to go. Users are currently juggling many devices, and using voice assistants across different devices and among differing operating system families. While this calls for a standard of some time – so users won’t need to adapt to each OS and instead each OS can adapt to them – no single standard has yet emerged.

Until more users either to choose to focus on one standard – such as staying within the Apple Siri/HomeKit family – they will continue to have the experience of speaking requests to Alexa in the ways Siri expects, to Cortana in the way Google Now or Assistant answer to, or some other combination. At least today the highly-touted artificial intelligence behind voice assistants hasn’t reached the level that one’s voice assistant would be jealous to discover you’ve been speaking with a different voice assistant.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

Comments Off on Voice Assistants – now we’re talking! (TUPdate)

Filed under Consumer research, Forward-Leaning, Operating systems, Smartphones, Tablets, TUP 2016, TUPdate