Category Archives: Entertainment

Tablet-First. Is it a thing? (TUPdate)

Tablet-First. Is it a thing? – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, February 17, 2017

Which comes first – Smartphone? Tablet? Notebook? For a small and steadily growing segment, the tablet comes first as the primary connected device.

Over the last three years, the share of connected adults using a tablet as their primary device has expanded. In our 2014 wave of TUP, we found that 6% of adults were using a tablet as their primary device – before a PC, mobile phone, or game console. In TUP 2015, the Tablet-First rate had grown to 7% and by TUP 2016, reached 9%.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-trend-metafacts-tup-2014-2016-2017-02-16_10-02-19

It’s not as if these Tablet-First users are only using a tablet. Among Tablet-First users, half (50%) use a Smartphone as their secondary device, followed distantly by a Tower Desktop (15%), Basic cell phone (10%), and Notebook PC (9%).

Tablets are also popular as second devices, with 17% of connected adults regularly using one as their secondary device. Half (50%) of these Tablets-Second users have a Smartphone as their primary device, followed by a Tower Desktop (23%), and Notebook PC (15%).

Who are these Tablet-First users?

Older women use a tablet as their primary device at a higher rate than other age/gender groups. Females age 35 and up have a higher Tablet-First rate than any other gender/age group.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-metafacts-tup-2016-us-2017-02-16_09-43-52

Besides age or gender distinctions, Tablet-First users aren’t especially technology early adopters or laggards, nor are they primarily lower socioeconomic groups which might be thought to not be able to afford notebooks or smartphones.

Tablet-First users do skew slightly higher among adults with less-than-average educational attainment, with 23% having a high school education or lower, somewhat higher than the 19% rate among connected adults.

Looking more deeply at how older women use tablets differently from younger women or other men, another pattern stands out. Older women use tablets for a broader range of activities than other age/gender groups. They simply get more out of these devices. This includes any tablet they use – not only the ones used as the primary device.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-most-broadly-active-by-gender-age-2017-02-17_10-45-44

Analyzing the top-third most-broadly-active by number of tablet activities by age and gender groups, females age 45 to 64 stand out. They are 24% higher than the national average than other age/gender groups based on how many activities they regularly do with their tablets. In contrast, males 65+ and 25-34 have the lowest levels of broad usage, indexing at only 75 or lower.

What other devices do they use?

Tablet-First users may choose to primarily use their Tablet, yet most have other devices. Three-fourths of Tablet-First users regularly use a PC, and over three-fourths (77%) regularly use a Smartphone. They have other mobile devices, such as a Notebook (42%) or a Home Notebook (36%). Another 36% have a second PC.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-other-devices-2017-02-16_10-29-09

The clear majority of Tablet-First users have more devices than their tablet – 99% have 2 or more. Eight-five percent have 3 or more connected devices they regularly use.

What are these Tablet-First tablets used for?

The users of Tablets as their primary device are busy with their tablets, checking email, shopping, having fun, and social networking. Over half of adults using a tablet as their primary device regularly use it for a wide range of activities. While checking personal email ranks at the top, shopping is nearly as strong.

What’s notably absent from the list of major activities are more-intensive productivity or graphical activities such as creating presentations. Instead, many of the major activities can be adequately done with a tablet that may or may not have an external keyboard.MetaFacts-td1702-tablet-first-activities-2017-02-16_15-29-21

Whose Tablet is used first more than others?

Apple’s iPad is the undisputed leader among the Tablet-First group, representing 57% of the installed base. The nearest contender is Samsung, with only a 10% share. Although Microsoft may begin to make inroads with their recently revamped Surface line, the current share is only 3%.

Looking ahead

Several aspects stand out from these results. While age-affected eyesight may contribute to older adults preferring devices with larger screens, it’s not as simple as age. So, I don’t expect tablet-makers to rush out to build ever-larger tablets as the population ages. It’s only among females that Tablet-First rates are highest, not among males. Also, when separating genders, rates don’t increase with age. The choice of activities is a big factor, as simple activities from online shopping to game playing and social networking are easily done with a tablet, and each benefit from having a larger screen.

Definitionally, the market is likely to get muddied for regular consumers. As notebook companies continue to innovate with convertible and 2-in-1 designs, the fuller functionality of notebooks is being integrated into devices as mobile as tablets. Furthermore, smartphone makers continue to experiment with larger screens. Also, Apple continues to position its popular iPad as a fully-functional “Super. Computer.” computing device.

For these Tablet-First users, though, who appear to be functioning well with a broad collection of devices, it seems unlikely that one single device will capture their hearts and fingers.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis.

This TUPdate was based on results in the TUP 2016 Chapter – Devices, Section DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices from TUP 2014, TUP 2015, and TUP 2016. Also, activity data was selected from Tablet Activities (Rows 670 ACT_TAB).

Related MetaFAQs

The following related MetaFAQs address questions included in this TUPdate.

MetaFAQs Question TUP Reference
mq0005 How prominent is remote printing from tablets? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxTAB] Tablet PC Activities
mq0038 Who uses their Smartphone as their primary connected device? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_PRIM] Respondent Demographics
mq0055 How are Tablets used differently than Notebook PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0059 How many Tablet PCs are used to make phone calls? For video calls? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxTAB] Tablet PC Activities
mq0063 Who are the Apple-only users? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D3-DEV_ECO/Device OS Ecosystems  Tables: [120 DRxDEV_ECO] Respondent Demographics
mq0083 How many adults regularly take pictures with their connected devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D5-KEY_DEV/Key Devices  Tables: [590 ACT_IMGxKEY_DEV] Graphics/Image Activities
mq0122 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [700 ACT_SPxOV] Smartphone Activities
mq0126 What is the primary communication device among Tablet owners? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [570 ACT_COMMxTAB] Communication Activities
mq0157 How prominent is printing images from tablets? Chapter: G Tablets  Section: G1-TAB/Tablets  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxTAB] Tablet PC Activities
mq0181 How are Smartphones used differently than Tablet PCs? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities
mq0220 Is there an age skew for Apple iPads? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A4-AGE/Age Ranges  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxAGE] Key Device Metrics
mq0263 Of those who use a Smartphone as their primary connected device, do they have more Windows, Android, or Apple devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [270 DEVxDEV_PRIM] Devices
mq0300 Of those who use a Notebook PC as their primary connected device, do they have more Windows, Android, or Apple devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [270 DEVxDEV_PRIM] Devices
mq0304 Is there an age gap between those who communicate primarily with their Smartphones, Tower Desktops, Notebooks, and Tablets? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L3-ACTCOMM/Communications  Tables: [120 DRxACTCOMM] Respondent Demographics
mq0377 What is the most popular combination of connected devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D1-COMBO/Device Combinations  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxCOMBO] Key Device Metrics
mq0378 Of those who use a Smartphone as their primary connected device, what other device have they used for most of their life? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [160 ADOPTxDEV_PRIM] Technology Adoption
mq0379 Of those who use a Smartphone as their primary connected device, what are their 2nd and 3rd devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDEV_PRIM] Key Device Metrics
mq0397 Can Apple rightly claim to have captured the biggest tech spenders? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [790 SPENDxKEY_DEV_OS] Tech Spending
mq0460 Is there an age or gender skew to connected music listening? Chapter: M Consumer Electronics  Section: MU-MUSIC/Music Players, Services, or Listening  Tables: [120 DRxMUSIC] Respondent Demographics
mq0474 Is there an age skew to TV watching, whether through through any combination of traditionally subscribed services (cable, satellite), over-the-top set-top boxes, or using a Connected Device? Chapter: M Consumer Electronics  Section: MT-TV_DEVACT/TVs, Boxes, or Services, TV or Video Watching  Tables: [120 DRxTV_DEVACT] Respondent Demographics
mq0495 What else do Apple Mac users own more often than the average Connected Adult? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics
mq0530 Of those who use a Smartphone as their primary connected device, how many connected devices do they actively use? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [490 UNITSxDEV_PRIM] Units
mq0531 Of those who use a Smartphone as their primary connected device, what are they planning to buy next? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [810 PLANSxDEV_PRIM] Purchase Plans
mq0535 Are the productivity-oriented Smartphone users very different in age from the average Connected Adult? Chapter: L Activities  Section: L8-ACTPROD/Personal/Productivity  Tables: [120 DRxACTPROD] Respondent Demographics
mq0626 Of those who use a Tower Desktop PC as their primary connected device, what are their 2nd and 3rd devices? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxDEV_PRIM] Key Device Metrics
mq0628 Of those who use a Tower Desktop PC as their primary connected device, how many connected devices do they actively use? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [490 UNITSxDEV_PRIM] Units
mq0629 Of those who use a Notebook PC as their primary connected device, how many connected devices do they actively use? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [490 UNITSxDEV_PRIM] Units
mq0630 Of those who use a Desktop PC as their primary connected device, what are they planning to buy next? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [810 PLANSxDEV_PRIM] Purchase Plans
mq0631 Of those who use a Notebook PC as their primary connected device, what are they planning to buy next? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D2-DEV_PRIM/Primary and Secondary Devices  Tables: [810 PLANSxDEV_PRIM] Purchase Plans
mq0677 How many adults use a Tablet using Apple iOS, Google Android, or Windows? Chapter: D Devices  Section: D6-KEY_DEV_OS/Key Devices by OS  Tables: [250 DEV_KEYxKEY_DEV_OS] Key Device Metrics
mq0663 How many users make video phone calls using their Tablet? Chapter: A User Profile  Section: A1-OV/Overview  Tables: [670 ACT_TABxOV] Tablet PC Activities

 

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Filed under Consumer research, Entertainment, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Shopping, Tablets, TUP 2016, TUPdate

Are most hearables being used by young males? (MetaFAQs)

Wireless headsets have been available for more than a decade, and are strongest among two age and gender groups. These hearables-active groups are also have above-average shares of VR Headset early adopters.metafacts-metafaqs-mq0100-120drxhear-2017-02-13_08-31-37

The strongest segments for active hearables use include younger males – age 18-44 and youngish females – age 25-34. Penetration is above one in four among males 25-34 (27%) and among males age 35-44 (26%). Among females, hearables usage peaks among females age 25-34, at 15%.

Looking ahead, we expect these same age & gender groups to continue as the strongest users of hearables, and don’t expect other segments to be as keen on hearables.

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Filed under Communication, Demographics & Econographics, Entertainment, Forward-Leaning, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Smartphones, TUP 2016, Usage Patterns, Video calling

Is there an age skew for using VR Headsets? (MetaFAQs)

Is there an age skew for using VR Headsets?

metafacts-metafaqs-mq0047-480-cexage-2017-02-02_11-00-09Virtual reality hasn’t reached market reality, despite decades of experimentation and overhyped false starts. Recent investment has brought renewed attention, hope, and development to the prospects of widespread VR use. Based on our TUP 2016 US survey, only 2% of connected adults are actively using a VR headset, such as the Oculus Rift or Samsung Gear VR. This modest acceptance rate is only part of the research finding, though, as there is more that can be learned from the early adopters.

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Filed under Entertainment, Graphics and Image, Market Research, MetaFAQs, Smartphones, TUP 2016

Device Primacy and OS – What we Hold Near (TUPdate)

Device Primacy and OS – What we Hold Near – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, January 18, 2017

Primacy. The first device you reach for, the one you stay near, the one you rely on. You might think that it’s the Smartphone, and that’s correct for many, but not all. For many activities and market segments, PCs and tablets dominate. A user’s activity focus affects which devices they choose most often, as does their operating system collection, among other factors.

Primacy by OS Family

All-Apple and all-Windows users are living in different worlds – as they have strikingly different preferences for their primary devices.
Among Apple-only users, Smartphones are the primary device for most types of activities. The PC (Mac or MacBook in this case) is their primary device for cloud storage/sharing and for search and information-related activities. Half (50%) of these adults using only Apple iOS or MacOS devices (no Microsoft Windows or Google Android or ChromeOS) do most of their cloud storage/sharing activities on a PC, and just under one-third (32%) primarily use a Smartphone.

In contrast, among Windows-only users, the PC is strongly the primary device for every major type of activity. Smartphones are only ranked second for productivity/personal and graphics/images activities. A tablet is the second choice for the greatest number of activity types – cloud storage/sharing, search/information, shopping, and social networking.metafacts-device-primacy-primary-secondary-device-2017-01-18_17-08-39

Apple’s iPad doesn’t rank as a second device for any type of activity among Apple-only users. This low level of primacy may seem surprising given that penetration of iPads is higher than average among this Apple-loyal segment. Sixty-one percent of Apple-only users regularly use an Apple iPad, more than double the national rate of 29%. This primacy analysis doesn’t mean Apple-only users aren’t enjoying their iPads – simply that they’re lower on the list of devices they choose for a wide range of activities.

Devices and Primacy
metafacts-device-primary-summary-170113
Across the entire base of connected adults, the PC is the leader for nearly every type of activity. The Swiss Army Knife broad nature of PCs continues its appeal. Smartphones only lead PCs for communications and graphics/imaging activities. Many of the specific activities in these two categories are strongly mobile – making phone calls, staying in touch, and taking and sharing photos.

OS Family

Connected Devices are dominated by three operating systems families – Microsoft Windows, Apple’s MacOS and iOS, and Google’s Android and Chrome OS. The base of Windows, once exclusively dominant, is well-overlapped by Apple and Google. The majority of users are living a multi-OS lifestyle, juggling more than OS family. The two largest OS combinations are nearly equal in market size. Just over one-fourth (26%) of users use connected devices running Windows and Google, and none with an Apple OS. Another fourth (25%) have Windows and Apple devices, with none as Google.metafacts-device-primacy-2017-01-12_16-25-15

Profile highlights of OS Family groups

It might be assumed that Apple-only users are early adopters while Windows-only users are laggards, partly explaining why they might choose different devices as primary or secondary. This is only partly true. The Windows-only users do include many tech laggards and the late majority, with 38% being the last of their age group to have first used a PC, mobile phone, or tablet. However, the Apple-only users aren’t especially early adopters, as 32% meet that definition, which is slightly less than the 33% nationwide who also do. There are other characteristics that set them apart.
Windows-only users are the oldest of the major OS family groups, on average 10 years older than every other group. They also include the smallest share of full-time employees, highest share of low-income households, and lowest average number of devices.metafacts-device-primacy-user-profile-highlights-by-os
Apple-only users have the highest share of younger millennials, have relatively high incomes, although are middling with respect to tech early adopters and laggards.
The jugglers of all three OS are the youngest, high incomes, more devices in use, and have the highest share of tech early adopters.

Activity types, primacy, ages and tech spending

Primacy of device by activity also varies with respect to the user’s age and consumer tech spending on devices and services. Younger adults aren’t necessarily the biggest tech spenders, nor are Smartphone users. In fact, those who primarily use their PCs for social networking or image/graphics activities are the biggest tech spenders and older than those who mostly use Smartphones for those activities.metafacts-device-primacy-age-device-spend-2017-01-18_12-36-08

The average age of adults who use a PC for the majority of their image/graphics activities – from managing photos to creating presentations – is 44, nearly five years older than those whose primary image/graphics device is a Smartphone. The graphics PC group also spends more than $1,450 per year more than Smartphone-focused users. Similarly, PC-focused Social Networkers are more than 8 years older and spend $730 more per year on consumer tech devices and services than their Smartphone counterparts.

Looking ahead

We expect tablets to continue to languish as a minor device for most users and most activity categories. As more 2-in-1 and convertible notebooks emerge and grow in acceptance, they will continue to relegate tablets to secondary or tertiary use.
Smartphones will continue their market penetration, replacing the basic cell phone among the last stalwart holdouts. Whether the last new Smartphone adopters will choose to go with Android or Apple Smartphones will set them on a course strongly affecting their next PC and tablet purchase. It’s most likely they will choose Google Android since this segment is more price-sensitive and less tech-savvy than average.
PCs will continue their gradual decline from primacy, to be replaced by Smartphones. Within PCs, there will be a broader division between the activity profiles for desktop and mobile PCs. We expect desktop PCs to continue their broad primary and secondary use, due to inertia and the as yet unmatched broad capabilities of PCs. Mobile PCs, however, while pressuring tablets, will themselves feel the strongest pressure from Smartphones as their broad usefulness continues to expand.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis. This TUPdate is based on the TUP Life Stage section, which is within the TUP 2016 User Profile Chapter.

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Filed under Basic cell phones, Behaviors and Activities, Cloud Storage, Communication, Desktops, Devices, Entertainment, Graphics and Image, Information and Search, Market Sizing, Mobile Phones, Multiple Devices, Notebooks, Shopping, Smartphones, Social Networking, Tablets, TUP 2016, TUPdate, Video calling

Life Stages and Technology Adoption – TUPdate

Life Stage and Technology Adoption – a TUPdate by Dan Ness, December 16, 2016

The stages of life – although many take different paths – are a useful component of understanding technology users. Pivotal life events shape us – forming a family or empty-nesting, passing key birthdays, or joining or leaving from the workforce.
Kids matter – in many ways, and very much so when it comes to understanding technology spending, usage, adoption, and the future of tech. Simply knowing whether children are present or not provides a lot of explanatory power for a technology user’s profile.metafacts-tup-life-stage-factors-2016-12-16_11-17-07

Presence of children is one of three factors that make up life stage analysis, with the other two being age and employment status.
Within the TUP study, MetaFacts determines life stage by creating eight mutually-exclusive groups, each formed by two values of three components. We grouped respondent’s ages into 18-39 (“younger”) and 40 and above (“older”), and presence of children into present or not present. Being employed in the workforce includes any working full-time, part-time, or self-employed. Those not employed outside the home include students, the retired, homemakers, seasonally unemployed and temporarily unemployed.
Life stage analysis is a useful and productive way to quickly sift through mountains of sociodemographics. These three factors, although not exhaustive, provide strong definitional power with respect to predicting and profiling technology acquisition and usage.

Tech Spending by Life Stage

The biggest tech spenders are those adults within the life stage group: younger, employed, and with children. Adults age 18-38 who have kids and are actively employed full-time, part-time, or self-employed spend 66% more on tech devices and services in a year than the average adult. The second-biggest life stage group in tech spending also have kids and are employed, although are age 40 and up. This group’s tech spend is 16% higher than the national average.metafacts-td161215-life-stage-tech-spend-index-2016-12-15_11-48-59
At the other end of the spectrum, with the lowest tech spending levels, are adults age 40+, not employed, and without kids. Their index of 67 reflects their tech spending levels 33% below the national average for connected adults. All of the life stage groups without children spend below the national average for tech devices and services. Also, adults who are not employed outside the home spend less than the average connected adult on tech.

Consumer Electronics and Life Stage

Life stage analysis reveals both laggards and early adopters of many leading technology products. The connected home appears to be doing well – although only among one life stage segment. Employed adults age 18-39 with children stand heads and shoulders above all other segments in market penetration. From smart locks to video doorbells, this group’s usage is significantly stronger than other life stage groups. This group is also clearly strongest in the use of certain other consumer electronics products – golf swing analyzers, GoPro-type headcams, and to further feather the nest, home projectors. Relative penetration of this last item is not quite as different, reflecting in part the higher price of home projectors compared to these other devices, and that they have been available for more years than the other devices.metafacts-td161215-life-stage-consumer-electronics-2016-12-15_14-30-47

One consumer electronic product has reached entirely different life stage segments – the venerable record player. Although turntables and vinyl albums have enjoyed some resurgence following their near-extinction, current usage is primarily among adults age 40 and up, and less so among younger adults. In addition to nostalgic ties and musical memories, these listeners also are more likely to have old LPs.

Life Stage Penetration of Key Tech Devices

Life stage analysis also reveals differences in the use of many key computing and printing devices. The notebook penetration rate among adults employed 18-39 with kids is double that of adults not employed 40+ without kids. There’s an even stronger difference for use of a second PC, with Employed 18-39 with kids having triple the penetration rate of not employed 40+ without kids. And, with nearly a quintuple rate difference, use of game consoles among not employed adults age 18-39 with kids is two-thirds (66%), 4.8 times higher than the 14% rate among not employed 40+ without children.metafacts-td161215-life-stage-key-devices-2016-12-15_14-30-47

Number of Devices by OS

Windows dominates computing devices, as it has for decades. Among all life stage groups, the average number of devices is highest for Windows devices. Apple and Google Android/Chrome devices are gaining in the average number in active use. Among adults 18-39 not employed, there is no difference between Windows and Apple in the number of each OS in active use.
Apple ranks second among all life stage segments except one – 40+, Not employed with Kids. Although the difference is small, this reflects the lower penetration Apple devices have among older adults.metafacts-td161215-key-devices-by-os-2016-12-16_08-03-24

Looking Ahead

Life stage analysis reveals important market segments, especially to separate laggards from early adopters of the newest technology. This approach also helps in predicting future adoption. As technology users navigate their own life courses and transitions. Although it isn’t true that parents leave a maternity ward with additional tech devices, it’s typically not too long that tech accumulation begins.

About this TUPdate

This TUPdate includes a complimentary brief summary of recent MetaFacts TUP (Technology User Profile) research results. These results are based on the most-recent results of the MetaFacts Technology User Profile 2016 survey, its 34th wave, with 7,334 respondents (US). For more information about MetaFacts and subscribing to TUP, please contact MetaFacts.

Resources

Current TUP subscribers can tap into any of the following TUP information used for this analysis or for even deeper analysis. This TUPdate is based on the TUP Life Stage section, which is within the TUP 2016 User Profile Chapter.

Supporting MetaFAQs

  • mq0137 – What is the penetration of home-owned computing devices? – [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE]
  • mq0257 – Which Life Stage segment spends the most on tech devices and services? – [790 SPENDxLIFE]
  • mq0215 – Which Life Stage segment use VR Headsets the most? – [480 CExLIFE]
  • mq0275 – Which Life Stage segments have the highest share of Windows, Apple, and Google OS devices? – [270 DEVxLIFE]
  • mq0594 – Which Life Stage group has the highest usage of Notebook PCs? – [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE]
  • mq0610 – Which Life Stage group has the highest usage of e-Book Readers? – [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE]

Related MetaFAQs

  • mq0091 – What is the percent of Home PC users that use printers? – [250 DEV_KEYxLIFE]
  • mq0237 – What is the average number of Home Tablets being used? – [490 UNITSxLIFE]
  • mq0236 – What is the average number of Home PCs being used? – [490 UNITSxLIFE]
  • mq0150 – Are many users using remote printing services? Are these using their Internet-ready printers or online printing services? Which segments are using remote printing as a substitute for home printing, and which as an additional way to print? – [590 ACT_IMGxLIFE]
  • mq0540 – How are TV and movie device usage levels different across Life Stage segments? – [480 CExLIFE]
  • mq0213 – How does the penetration of OS Ecosystems vary by device type? – [250 DEV_KEYxDEV_ECO]

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Filed under Consumer research, Demographics & Econographics, e-Book Readers, Entertainment, Notebooks, Printers, TUP 2016, TUPdate, Usage Patterns