Tag Archives: Mobile

Printers and Printing – solid research results from Technology User Profile

Extensive information about PC, Smartphone, Tablet, and cloud printing is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Certain segments of consumers are increasingly finding ways to share some images and documents without printing, while other segments continue to print as usual.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to printers and printing activities. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece.

  • How many printers do people actively use?
  • How do Home Printer users differ from those primarily using Work or Shared printers?
  • Are most workplace printers in small or large businesses?
  • Which home printer brands have attracted tech Early Adopters?
  • Whose Home Printer customers have the most printers?
  • Whose Home Printer customers are more likely to use Monochrome than Color?
  • Whose Home Printer customers are most likely to use WiFi to connect their printer?
  • Whose Home Printer customers have the newest Printers?
  • Whose Home Printer customers use their devices for the broadest range of Graphics/Image activities?
  • Whose Home Printer customers are the biggest overall tech spenders?
  • How does the market share vary between Home and Work printers?
  • How does the market share vary between Home and Work printers by printer type?
  • How much does the HP printer footprint overlap Canon, Epson, and Brother?
  • Where are monochrome printers used the most, and by what margin?
  • Which printers are newest – Home, Workplace, or Public/shared?
  • Do users print more pages on Home, Workplace, or Shared/Public printers?
  • What is the frequency of printer consumables purchase?
  • To what extent is refilled ink being used for Home printers?
  • How much does the average home printer users\ spend on printers and ink/toner?
  • Which segments have the highest share using refilled ink/toner?
  • Whose Home Printer customers spend the most for ink, toner, or paper?
  • Whose Home Printer customers are most likely to use refilled ink/toner?
  • Special printer paper? Who uses it and what for? Is it only photos, or something else?
  • Do color laser printer users use their devices for graphics or images more than average users?
  • Among Home printer users, what is the preferred device for graphics/image activities?
  • What are the main printer activities?
  • What are the most common documents (maps, spreadsheets, photos, etc.) that consumers print on their inkjet printers? How about their laser printers?
  • How many are using their home printer to print images directly from their Smartphones or Tablets?
  • How many people use remote printing services?
  • Are many users using remote printing services? Are these using their Internet-ready printers or online printing services?
  • Which segments are using remote printing as a substitute for home printing, and which as an additional way to print?
  • How prominent is printing images from mobile phones? How about from tablets?
  • Are most Home printers purchased from the same types of outlets as ink/toner is?
  • Are most Home printers purchased from the same types of outlets as Home PCs are?
  • Where are printer users buying their printer supplies? Are these the same channels as where they buy their printers?
  • What channels do people use for buying PCs? How about printers and printer supplies?
  • Where do people buy their printer supplies?
  • Which segments are utilizing cloud storage or sharing services? For which activities?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full TUP datasets.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

The above questions are answered with the TUP 2014 edition, and most are also answered in earlier TUP editions for ready trend comparison.

About MetaFacts

MetaFacts, Inc. is a market research firm focusing exclusively on the technology industries. MetaFacts’ Technology User Profile (TUP) survey is the longest-running, large-scale comprehensive study of its kind, conducted continuously since 1983, the year before Apple released the Apple Macintosh. The detailed results are a primary market sizing and segmentation resource for leading companies providing consumer-oriented technology products and services, such as PCs, printers, software applications, peripherals, consumer electronics, mobile computing, and related services and products. TUP analyzes key trends and the data-rich source can be dived into more deeply for custom analysis. For more information about the syndicated research service, analysis tools, publications and datasets, contact MetaFacts at 1-760-635-4300.

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Filed under Market Research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2014

How many Apple iPhone users have older iPhones or contracts? (MetaFAQs)

As Apple releases its latest round of iPhones, a key question is who will buy. The three major areas of acceptance for the newest iPhones are from first-time Smartphone users, among converted Google Android smartphone users, or within the replacement market of current iPhone users upgrading to a newer iPhone.

To help estimate the market uptake, one of many key questions which MetaFacts addresses: How many Apple iPhone users have older contracts? Subscribers with unexpired contracts or those nearing expiration have a higher likelihood to consider upgrading their iPhone, or to possibly switch to an Android phone.
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Across major Smartphone brands, Apple has the greatest exposure in the market place based on when contracts expire. A higher percentage of its contract subscribers will expire sooner than other major Smartphone makes. 59% of Apple iPhone subscribers either have a contract which will expire by March 2015 or earlier, or whose contracts have already expired. By comparison, other major brands Samsung, LG, and Motorola have fewer subscribers whose contracts will expire by then.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2014 edition. More can be found in the Mobile Phones chapter. The large-scale survey is in its 32nd continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.
For this MetaFAQs analysis, MetaFacts is sharing a portion of the answers to selected survey questions: specifically the contract expiration date among Smartphone subscribers. The full TUP service includes further related details on the wireless carriers with the greatest exposure, subscriber profiles, other devices users are using, the activities across multiple connected devices, the age of Smartphones, and the penetration of Basic cell phones. The TUP survey gathers comprehensive details about the active usage of many consumer electronics products, including Smartphones, Basic cell phones, and many other connected devices. The survey also details the segments of buyers which change their technology more – or less – often than others.

In addition to tracking the age and contracts of Smartphones, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about technology adoption, wireless technology, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

MetaFAQs – Frequently Asked Questions with answers supported by the facts: the MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2014

Tech Spending Higher Among Showrooming Buyers

There’s an adage that shoppers vote with their feet, and it can be argued that with the increased use of Smartphones, shoppers are voting with their fingers. Retailers have long wrestled with the balance of generating traffic and having shoppers visit only to ultimately go buy somewhere else. This practice, sometimes called Showrooming, is mostly a reflection of the intelligence and desires of buyers. Using any Smartphones and either a specialized app or even a simple web browser, it’s much easier for consumers to compare prices and products while they are in a brick and mortar outlet.

It might be assumed that shoppers who use their Smartphones to compare products and pricing are low spenders. In fact, the opposite is true.

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

Based on recent primary research by MetaFacts as part of our Technology User Profile (TUP) service, we’ve found that tech spending levels are 37% higher among these careful buyers than the average Smartphone user. Furthermore, tech spending levels are 81% higher than the average Internet-connected adult.

These active buyers are also unique in many other ways, and augmented in-store comparison is an important and long-time growing trend to reckon with.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2013 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 31st continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.

For this analysis, MetaFacts is sharing the answers to two key survey questions. The TUP survey gathers tech spending levels for both tech products and ongoing tech services, and split out between types of consumer electronics, computers, imaging, Internet, and other categories. The survey also details what consumers actually do with their many tech devices, including the product and price comparison they do within retailers.

In addition to tracking the regular activities of Smartphones, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about retail or online shoppers, Smartphone users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

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Filed under Consumer research, TUP 2013, TUPdate

Tech Media, Advertising, TV – solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive information about tech media, advertising and TV is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

Today’s media-savvy consumers may want their MTV, but they might seek alternative methods to get it.  Advertising seems to have become an option for the consumer, who today is able to bypass commercials, salespeople, and even email in favor of social networking and other sites.  Advertisers in this day and age have to be both flexible and targeted while ubiquitous in order to get their message across.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to tech media, advertising, and television. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it delivers solid answers to the following questions, and more.

  • Which tech buyers focus more on retail than shopping online and vice versa?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Who is printing coupons?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • How many screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • Online shoppers – are they everyone, or unique?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Who are the people who shop for technology products on the web, but purchase at a local retail outlet?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How do online shopping activities differ between Hewlett Packard, Apple and Dell customers?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • How many and which segments are watching and renting movies on which platforms?
  • Which social networks show the most growth-oriented activity? Which segments show signs of losing interest or withdrawing?
  • Tech adoption cycles may not be as fast as the tech-focused think. How many and which users still use older tech products?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Are Apple’s retail shoppers already the Apple-faithful or is Apple drawing in the unconverted? Who are these shoppers?
  • What makes a smartphone a smartphone in the consumer’s eyes? How does usage compare to basic mobile phones? What are the user segments and usage profiles?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Which market segments are blogging? How do they compare to social networkers?
  • Which PC brands dominate the PC market? How does this vary within market segment?
  • Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • How does the life and lifespan of a PC vary by form factor? Does it vary by brand? By user segment?
  • How much of the game-playing population is older versus younger?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from? Are smartphones or netbooks changing this?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Consumer research, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Statistics, Tech Market, Trends, TUP 2011, TUP 2012

Multi-Platform Usage Shifts-Solid market research from MetaFacts Technology User Profile

Extensive solid information about multi-platform usage shifts–who accesses what technology, and where and how they do it–is available in TUP – Technology User Profile.

As consumers’ options for communication, entertainment, and organization grow, one thing seems to stay the same:  change. The more choices that choosy consumers have, the more choices they want, and if they can get it all in one package–even better. But that may not mean that smartphones are replacing PCs–when you can have all the options in one place, certain consumers prefer a few devices to choose between.

Below are a few examples of questions addressed in TUP related to the multi-platform reality. The full TUP service enables drilling down beyond the answers to these questions to identify which other technologies, services and behaviors are disruptive and to profile which market segments are and aren’t adopting. TUP is much more than a one-dimensional market view or opinion piece, since it provides dynamic data to answer the following key questions, as well as many others.

  • Who are the true early adopters and laggards? How does this vary by actual usage of specific products and technologies?
  • Which combination of tech devices is the most popular today? How large is each segment? Who are in each segment? Which direction are they headed with their buying plans?
  • Multitasking – who’s using many devices for many activities, versus few devices for many activities? How do user segments vary by quadrant?
  • What is the mix of communication products and services – landline, wireless, email, IM, etc. – by segment?
  • Is it really one to a customer? How often are PCs shared? Which market segments use more than one PC?
  • Primacy – what is the center of the user’s world? Their home PC, work PC, mobile phone? Is it one device or many?
  • How many device screens do people view? Which market segments view more screens than other segments?
  • How are users communicating, given all their communication options?
  • What do users sync or “store” in the cloud? How do users share images – social networking sites or photo-specific sites? Which users are the most active?
  • Are PC users primarily accessing the Internet at home, in the workplace, using friends or neighbor’s computers, or in public places such as libraries or cybercafés? Which users use other’s PCs and which have many to choose from?
  • What do most people do with their mobile phone as compared to their PC? Which user segments align with which platforms?
  • Which segments are keeping their files, calendars, or other information synchronized or backed up online?
  • What is the status of mobile phone transition, from basic feature phones to smartphones and non-users?
  • Entertainment primacy – what is the center of the user’s home entertainment world? Is it one device or many? Which devices and services, and among which segments?
  • Do PC users behave differently as they gain more experience? Are Newbies or Vets mostly focusing on certain activities versus a broad mixture? Who is videoconferencing, and using which platform?
  • Which market segments interact with their social network using their mobile phone, and which do not? What else stands out about these connected users?
  • Age-related market adoption – which products and services are age-skewed? Which are skewed toward older rather than younger users?
  • How PC/Online & Mobile Phone activities compare? How is this different for Tablets or eBook Readers? Which segments use which device for the most activities?
  • Which segments are utilizing cloud storage or sharing services? For which activities? What is the tech-owning profile of active gamers? Many consumer electronics entertainment products or focused on gaming? Many computers or few? How does this vary by segment?
  • What types and combinations of consumer electronics are homes using?
  • Is the smartphone killing PC shopping?
  • Which segments are the most music-intensive? What is the overlap of music-centered products and services by segment?
  • Who spends the most hours online?
  • What other activities are just outside the box for gamers? Online dating? Social Networking? Music? Movies? Entertainment in general?
  • How much have PC users integrated PCs into their personal lives?
  • To what extent does game-playing drive online usage specifically and tech usage overall?
  • Who are the biggest tech spenders? Which segments spend the most and least for devices? How does spending for tech services differ?
  • Which smartphone OS is leading, and with which market segments?
  • Have game-players been the first to adopt new products such as the Apple iPhone? Or, are they generally later adopters?
  • iPhone users – who are they really? How do they compare with Android and Blackberry users?
  • What are the attitudes about texting and driving? Who is most supportive and who is mostly opposed?
  • Who’s busiest – desktop users or notebook users? How do their profiles differ?
  • Netbooks – are they replacing notebooks? Stalling smartphones? Withering?
  • Do Apple users “grow up and give up” their Apple? When do they get one again, if they do?
  • How much is assisted navigation part of life – and on which platform? Which user segments use which devices or services?
  • How are smartphones challenging or complementing mobile PCs? Which market segments are coalescing around which platforms?
  • Do game players bring their gaming with them into the workplace? To what extent? Which market segment does this the most?
  • Which key tech devices are consumers planning to buy? Which segments show the strongest plans and how does this compare to their tech spending?
  • Who is using mobile payments?
  • How prominent is Home PC renting versus outright purchase?
  • How rich is the user’s printing experience? Do they use only one printer or more than one? For multi-printer users, which ones do they use? Who are the most-active printer users?
  • What is the impact on privacy concerns on use of social networking?
  • How are Facebook users different from users of other Social Networks? Beside demographics, what else distinguishes these from each other?
  • Which segments are using which tech devices & carriers? For which activities?
  • How many people use calendars on their PC, their mobile phone, or both? Which types of people are these?
  • Who is buying the highest-end PCs? Are there brand differences? What else do users buy and what else do they use?
  • Netbooks – what are true adoption rates, and into which market segments?
  • Most-mobile customers – where do they go and what do they do?
  • How has the division of work vs. personal use of technology products continued to blur?

If solid answers to any of these questions would help your work in creating the future, please contact MetaFacts.

MetaFacts, Inc. helps technology marketers find and measure their best and future customers.

Current subscribers of Technology User Profile may obtain this information directly from MetaFacts, as well as additional customized drilling down into the full dataset.

For more information on the results delivered in TUP and about how to subscribe, please contact MetaFacts.

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Filed under Busy Mobiles Profile Report, Consumer research, Households, Market Research, Market Segmentation, MetaFAQs, Mobile Phones, Multiple-PC Household, Statistics, Tech Market, Technology, Trends, TUP 2010, TUP 2011, TUP 2012