Coming Face to Face With Newer Technology-Call The Kids

Can You Hear Me Now? (c) MetaFacts

Can You Hear Me Now? (c) MetaFacts

There’s a cartoon making the rounds online about a FaceTiming family. While Mom and the teens can clearly see each other’s faces, Dad doesn’t seem to get it that holding the phone to his ear isn’t the best way to communicate using FaceTime or video calling.
Those of us who are facile with technology products – let’s not be hard on any new users. After all, activities like communication work best when everyone is involved.
Newer technology can be daunting, even those who are well-experienced with one type of technology may be new to another. Age alone does not define who is the most experienced or tech-savvy.
Presence of children is a contributing factor with technology adoption. Based on results from the most-recent wave of Technology User Profile, adults in households with children are more interested in wearable technology. Over half (52%) of adults in households with children agree or strongly agree with the statement “I would love to be the first to use wearable technology.” Adults in households without children aren’t as enthusiastic, with only one-third (33%) similarly agreeing.
Making video calls with services as Microsoft Skype, Apple FaceTime, ooVoo, Tango, Google Hangouts, or the like is done more often among households with kids present. Just over one third (34%) of all Connected Adults who use their devices to communicate make video calls. Among younger (18-39) employed adults with children in their household, well over half (57%) make video calls. Among older (40+) adults who aren’t employed without children present, the number is one-sixth (16%).
Even in one narrow type of activity – communications – there are a wealth of options. From social networking to email and voice or video calls, technology users have choices.(c) MetaFacts
The top-third of the most broadly communicative among us use their Connected Devices for 7 or more types of communication activities – from email to voice calls, text messaging to video calls.
One of the biggest factors separating the most-active communicators from others is the presence of children, along with age and employment status.
Among adults age 40 and up, employed and with children in the household, 39% are in this most-active communicator group. By comparison, only one-fourth (25%) of those without children in the household are as active. The difference is even more striking among the 40+ who are not employed outside the home: One-third (33%) of those with children in the household are the most-active, versus only 13% of those without children.
Video calls and apps like FaceTime are just one mode of communications in active use. Not everyone uses the same mode of communication. While some of us favor email, others prefer text messaging.
For adults with children in the household, several communication activities are used more often than for similar adults without children.(c) metafacts
Writing a blog or online journal is an activity for many more adults in households with children than among those without, at 24% and 14% of Connected Adults, respectively. For making video calls, the gap is slightly narrower at 9% – the difference between 47% of adults with kids and 28% of those without.
In households with any children age 5 and younger, adults use the broadest range of communication activities across their Connected Devices. Just over half (51%) use 7 or more types of communication activities, well above the one-third of Connected Adults this usage level represents.
It was a prescient Groucho Marx who once quipped: “A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five.”
Fortunately, over 63 million adults have children in their households. Whether or not those younger pioneers will be kind and show their elders how to use their devices to communicate remains to be seen. Whether anyone will ever develop an inter-generational translator, so that parents and teens can finally understand each other, is something perhaps too daunting for even the technology industry.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2014 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 32nd continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use. In addition to detailing the many devices adults use to connect and sizing targeted market segments, the survey-based research details what people do with their devices. It reports which activities adults primarily use with which device. For example, TUP reports which market segments use their Smartphones or Desktops as their primary communication device, as well as which devices are primarily for entertainment, shopping, social networking, and other types of activities.

Further results and datasets are available to TUP subscribers, including the full details on these technology users: which devices they intend to buy, which other devices they already actively use, the activities they’re doing and which device they do them with, their complete demographic profile, tech spending, wearable technology, and more.
Technology companies who want to know more about adults with or without children, video callers users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

Leave a comment

Filed under Households, Market Research, TUP 2014, TUPdate, Video calling

Apple’s Girds Up Its Legs With Handoff

A table is more stable when each leg is strong and when each leg supports the others. In Apple’s most recent operating system upgrade, the Handoff feature stands to capitalize on Apple’s strengths, to stem defections, and possibly to attract new customers.

Apple gets it – to focus on technology users and what users do – and not only on the devices themselves. By making the interaction between key devices fluid, users will be more likely to choose future devices which interoperate instead of buying separate islands.Handoff questions-MetaFacts

Also, while many companies have tried to reduce customer defection by effectively padlocking the exit doors, even skirting consumer protection laws and the ire of the FTC, it’s more positive long-term to provide customers reasons to stay. While many customers recognize their choices will restrict them to a walled garden, they may choose to stay longer provided the fruits are as promised.

Many users are juggling multiple products. Over half – 55% – of Connected Adults actively use four or more devices. This spans PCs, Tablets, Smarpthones, e-Book Readers, and other Connected Devices. Any moves to integrate the user’s experience in a more seamless way will increase the chances that users will choose to stay within a given ecosystem, such as Apple’s.

Handoff promises to let users smoothly juggle their Apple devices in the middle of an activity. For example, when a call or message arrives on a user’s iPhone, they can choose to take the call on their nearby iPad or Mac.

At the current time, 38% of Connected Adults have at least one of the three key Apple devices: an iPhone, iPad, or Mac. However, Apple has a cliff to climb, since 63% of these Apple customers use only one type of these devices.Apple Handoff Size Funnel-MetaFacts

So, at most, today only 37% of Apple’s customers can benefit from Handoff features because they have at least two of the three Apple devices. The actual number is smaller since the Handoff’s full capability will only be available to those with devices which can run the most current operating system.

Apple’s footprint is split by iPhone users and iPad users, at 24% and 20% of Connected Adults, respectively. These two groups overlap minimally. Only 26% of Apple’s customers use both an iPhone and iPad.

Which direction are consumers likely to head? They’ve told us. Among iPhone users, more of those planning to buy a Tablet plan to get an Apple iPad. Among iPad users, more of those planning to buy a Smartphone are planning to buy an iPhone. This bodes well for Apple.

While Microsoft, Google, and the affected competitors could collaborate a coordinated response with their own responses, this will require substantial technical and business cooperation. Continuity capabilities will most likely first come from individual apps. For example, communication apps such as Viber have already extended their capabilities to simultaneously continue conversations across multiple platforms.
Bob Dance - MetaFacts
Consumers have proven they are willing to juggling multiple devices. In doing what MetaFacts calls the BOB Dance, they will choose the devices which are best-suited to a particular tasks, the Best Of Breed (BOB). Then, over time, they opt towards fewer devices and accepting a one-fits-all approach even if the experience is substandard. Witness the death of the everyday digital camera, quickly replaced by Smartphones well before image quality met that of inexpensive cameras.

More-encompassing approaches such as the integration promised by Apple Handoff may herald the era of Fluid Devices, where the user can smoothly and flexibly choose to use their “best” device at the moment that best suits them.

The consumer’s perennial focus on convenience means that Apple’s Handoff capabilities will strengthen loyalty among the Apple-faithful and will slowly increase their footprint among those with at least one Apple device. More importantly to Apple, the heightened conveniences will help delay loss of Apple customers to the Google or Microsoft world.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2014 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 32nd continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use. In addition to detailing the many devices adults use to connect and sizing targeted market segments, the survey-based research details what people do with their devices. It reports which activities adults primarily use with which device. For example, TUP reports which market segments use their Smartphones or Desktops as their primary communication device, as well as which devices are primarily for entertainment, shopping, social networking, and other types of activities.

Further results and datasets are available to TUP subscribers, including the full details on these technology users: which devices they intend to buy, which other devices they already actively use, the activities they’re doing and which device they do them with, their complete demographic profile, their tech spending, wearable technology, and more.
Technology companies who want to know more about retail or online shoppers, Smartphone users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

Leave a comment

Filed under TUP 2014, TUPdate

How many Apple iPhone users have older iPhones or contracts? (MetaFAQs)

As Apple releases its latest round of iPhones, a key question is who will buy. The three major areas of acceptance for the newest iPhones are from first-time Smartphone users, among converted Google Android smartphone users, or within the replacement market of current iPhone users upgrading to a newer iPhone.

To help estimate the market uptake, one of many key questions which MetaFacts addresses: How many Apple iPhone users have older contracts? Subscribers with unexpired contracts or those nearing expiration have a higher likelihood to consider upgrading their iPhone, or to possibly switch to an Android phone.
2014-09-19 07.58.16
Across major Smartphone brands, Apple has the greatest exposure in the market place based on when contracts expire. A higher percentage of its contract subscribers will expire sooner than other major Smartphone makes. 59% of Apple iPhone subscribers either have a contract which will expire by March 2015 or earlier, or whose contracts have already expired. By comparison, other major brands Samsung, LG, and Motorola have fewer subscribers whose contracts will expire by then.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2014 edition. More can be found in the Technology Adoption chapter. The large-scale survey is in its 32nd continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.
For this MetaFAQs analysis, MetaFacts is sharing a portion of the answers to selected survey questions: specifically the contract expiration date among Smartphone subscribers. The full TUP service includes further related details on the wireless carriers with the greatest exposure, subscriber profiles, other devices users are using, the activities across multiple connected devices, the age of Smartphones, and the penetration of Basic cell phones. The TUP survey gathers comprehensive details about the active usage of many consumer electronics products, including Smartphones, Basic cell phones, and many other connected devices. The survey also details the segments of buyers which change their technology more – or less – often than others.

In addition to tracking the age and contracts of Smartphones, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about technology adoption, wireless technology, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

MetaFAQs – Frequently Asked Questions with answers supported by the facts: the MetaFacts.

Leave a comment

Filed under Consumer research, MetaFAQs, TUP 2014

Are tech wearers early adopters? (MetaFAQs on Wearable Technology)

Today’s earliest adopters of wearable technology include some, but not only, the earliest tech adopters. The first 10% of connected adults are using any of a HeadCam (such as a GoPro), a fitness tracker (such as FitBit), or a Smartwatch. These leading users are 41% higher than the average connected adult in their share of Early Adopters for key tech products. 22% of these adults sporting a wearable device were the first in their age group to adopt a PC, Mobile phone, or Tablet PC.GoPro goes surfing Creative Commons License courtesy Gordon Tarpley

Expanding the definition of wearable technology to include actively used Bluetooth Headsets, this group accounts for 18% of connected adults. These wearable technology users also include a higher-than-average share of Early Adopters, with 21%.

Although wearable technology products have been available and market-tested for decades, market conditions are finally pointing to this as an area of growth. Mobility as a lifestyle has expanded beyond the core road warriors into other market segments. Furthermore, awareness has broadened beyond the small set of enthusiasts. A substantial number of connected adults say they are eager to be “first” with wearable technology, and these aren’t only the early adopters.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under MetaFAQs, TUP 2014

Tech Spending Higher Among Showrooming Buyers

There’s an adage that shoppers vote with their feet, and it can be argued that with the increased use of Smartphones, shoppers are voting with their fingers. Retailers have long wrestled with the balance of generating traffic and having shoppers visit only to ultimately go buy somewhere else. This practice, sometimes called Showrooming, is mostly a reflection of the intelligence and desires of buyers. Using any Smartphones and either a specialized app or even a simple web browser, it’s much easier for consumers to compare prices and products while they are in a brick and mortar outlet.

It might be assumed that shoppers who use their Smartphones to compare products and pricing are low spenders. In fact, the opposite is true.

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

[Photo courtesy of nobihaya under a Creative Commons license]

Based on recent primary research by MetaFacts as part of our Technology User Profile (TUP) service, we’ve found that tech spending levels are 37% higher among these careful buyers than the average Smartphone user. Furthermore, tech spending levels are 81% higher than the average Internet-connected adult.

These active buyers are also unique in many other ways, and augmented in-store comparison is an important and long-time growing trend to reckon with.

Source

These results are based on the most recent wave of Technology User Profile, the TUP 2013 edition. The large-scale survey is in its 31st continuous year, documenting and detailing the full scope of technology adoption and use.

For this analysis, MetaFacts is sharing the answers to two key survey questions. The TUP survey gathers tech spending levels for both tech products and ongoing tech services, and split out between types of consumer electronics, computers, imaging, Internet, and other categories. The survey also details what consumers actually do with their many tech devices, including the product and price comparison they do within retailers.

In addition to tracking the regular activities of Smartphones, Technology User Profile details the many devices which online adults use to regularly connect to the Internet. The survey-based research details what people do with their devices, where they spend their technology dollars, and how often they update (or don’t update) their technology products.

Technology companies who want to know more about retail or online shoppers, Smartphone users, or about their current or future customers can contact MetaFacts to learn how to subscribe to the rich resources of Technology User Profile.

Leave a comment

Filed under Consumer research, TUP 2013, TUPdate